Hanover Forest Science Seminar Series

About

The Hanover Forest Science Seminar Series was established in 2002 to honor the memory of Dr. Jim Hanover.

Hanover was trained in forest genetics. His research ranged extensively from basic science—outlining the mode of monoterpene inheritance in western white pine—to the applied research—developing faster growing red and jack pines in Michigan. 

Hanover’s overriding passion was to develop genetically improved planting stock and advance the science of forest genetics. He worked on conventional forest crops, biomass production, and the ornamental market. Hanover had many accomplishments throughout his career. He received the first patent granted to a woody plant under the Plant Variety Protection Act (for a blue and white spruce hybrid). He founded the Michigan Cooperative Tree Improvement Project, a collaboration with the Michigan DNR to provide genetically improved planting stock. He was also an MSU University Distinguished Professor.

Perhaps his greatest legacy is the many graduate students he mentored. His students have contributed to fields as varied as quantitative forest genetics, forest policy, forest economics, tree improvement, and even the development of peach rootstock and raspberry varieties.

Hanover was very active in the scientific community. He served as an officer on the editorial boards of several scientific journals. He also co-originated the biennial North American Forest Biology Workshop, chaired the Society of American Foresters Genetics and Tree Improvement Working Group, and served as Program Manager for the USDA Competitive Grants Program in Forest Biology.

Historic photo of Jim Hanover in an MSU greenhouse

Current Events

Nov 28

Hanover Forest Science Seminar Series: Matt Baker

November 28, 2017 4:00PM - 5:00PM at the Natural Resources Building, Room 225

Matt Baker from the University of Maryland presents "Linking river valley flood regimes to floodplain forest composition and functional traits: contrasting flood dynamics and forest patterns in Michigan and Maryland."

Past Presentations:

  • 2016-2017
  •  2015-2016
    • John Banks, "Forest management for bolstering wildlife species assemblages: conservation challenges in an East African forest reserve"
    • Fernana Santos, "Tracing the fate of slowly-cycling C pools in temperate forest soils"
    • Alon Tal, "All the trees of the forest: the extraordinary story of Israel's woodlands"
    • Bron Taylor, "Spirituality after Darwin: 'dark green' nature religion and the future of religion and nature"
    • Dengsheng Lu, "The roles of textural images in improving land-cover classification in the Brazilian Amazon"
    • Warren Heilman, "Local air quality during low-intensity prescribed fires in forested environments: observations and predictions"
    • Nina Lany, "Spring tree phenology, caterpillar abundance, and the timing of breeding by a migratory songbird in a northern hardwoods forest"
    • Jiquan Chen, "Harmonizing people and nature"
    • John Vucetich, "Laws of nature, historical contingency, and the wolves and moose on Isle Royale"
    • Yvette Dickinson, "Groupy-clumpy restoration of a frequent-fire conifer ecosystem on Colorado’s Front Range"
    • Stephanie Grand, "Soil carbon dynamics in short-rotation woody plantations of the northern Lake States"
  • 2014-2015
    • Erika Marin-Spiotta, "Challenges predicting successional trajectories during post-agricultural reforestation in the tropics"
    • Runsheng Yin, "Linking devolved tenures with forest conditions in the context of climate change mitigation"
    • Inga Parker La Puma, "Landscape disturbance in the modern forest: modeling the role of human influences on forest ecosystems"
    • Ines Ibanez, "The role of biotic interactions in tree range expansion"
    • Aaron Weiskittel, "Projecting the potential influence of climate change on forests: the uncertainty of modeling the unknown"
    • Emily Scott, "How carbon sticks to soils and how carbon cycling processes stick in students’ minds"
    • Emilio Moran, "Deforestation and environmental changes in the Amazon Basin"
    • Christopher Woodall, "Foresters counting atoms: the forest carbon inventory of the United States"
    • Stephen Gasteyer, "Measuring the social significance of forests: social indicators of forests and bioenergy"
    • Matt Carroll, "15 years of fieldwork on wildland fire in the wildland-urban interface: does it add up to anything?"
    • Marla Emery, "Consuming the city: urban forests as components of the urban food system"
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