Camden Endowed Teacher/Scholar Award

The College of Agriculture and Natural Resources is pleased to announce the call for nominations for the Howard and Lili Camden Endowed Teacher/Scholar Award. The purpose of this award is to acknowledge quality teaching in CANR.   

Eligibility

Candidate must have five or more years of teaching service in CANR. Tenure system and fixed-term faculty, academic specialists and instructors are eligible. Departmental Advisory/Awards Committees and individual faculty members may submit nomination packets. Students should contact their department or school awards committee for assistance in preparing a nomination.

Nominations Materials

Nomination packets should address each of the six following areas, with packets limited to no more than four pages excluding supporting letters (if included). Please include no more than four letters of support. Unsigned letters should not be included in review packets.

  1. Candidate has a demonstrated teaching record that has helped students gain skills conducive to problem-solving and the use of common sense.
  2. Candidate has developed innovative teaching methods and/or materials and has successfully applied these at MSU.
  3. Candidate has taught a significant number of undergraduate and/or graduate courses.
  4. Candidate demonstrates mentoring inside and outside the classroom.
  5. Candidate is respected by CANR constituent groups through professional involvements and/or recognitions.
  6. Candidate has demonstrated instructional excellence, scholarly achievement, and professional linkages. 

Questions should be directed to Kelly Millenbah at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) or 517-355-0234.

Email one PDF copy of the nomination packet to: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address), subject Line: Camden

All material must be received by Feb. 19, 2016. Award winners will be recognized at the CANR Faculty & Staff Picnic.

Past Recipients

  • Amber Peters (FW)
  • Daniel Hayes (FW)
  • Larry Zink (AFRE)
  • Gretchen Hill (ANS)
  • Lorraine Weatherspoon (FSHN)
  • Joe Domecq (ANS)
  • Janice Harte (FSHN)
  • John Shelle (ANS)
  • Scott Winterstein (FW)
  • Patricia Sorrano named Beal Outstanding Faculty Award winner

    Patricia Sorrano named Beal Outstanding Faculty Award winner

    Posted on February 5, 2016 2:11pm

    Each year, William J. Beal Outstanding Faculty Award winners are honored for a comprehensive and sustained record of scholarly excellence in research and/or creative activities, instruction and outreach. The William J. Beal Outstanding Faculty Awards are supported by the Office of University Development.

    This year, Patricia Sorrano, a professor in the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, was recognized as a Beal Outstanding Faculty Award Winner. 

  • CANR leaders participate in APLU food systems institute

    CANR leaders participate in APLU food systems institute

    Posted on February 5, 2016 11:46am

    Titus Awokuse and Gretchen Neisler are the newest graduate and participant, respectively, of an Association of Public and Land-grand Universities (APLU) leadership program that focuses on food systems.

     

  • MSU LEAF collecting old jeans

    Posted on February 5, 2016 11:24am

    MSU LEAF Club is partnering with Sole Hope this February to collect old blue jeans.

     

  • MSU Grad Laura Casai Honored as 2016 Member of Oakland County Executive’s Elite 40 under 40

    MSU Grad Laura Casai Honored as 2016 Member of Oakland County Executive’s Elite 40 under 40

    Posted on February 5, 2016 10:14am

    Laura C. Casai, IIDA, LEED AP (MSU ’06, B.A., Interior Design), TMP Architecture’s Director of Interior Design, was recently announced as a member of the Oakland County, Michigan, Executive’s Elite 40 Under 40 Class of 2016.

    Nearly 450 nominations were reviewed by an independent panel of judges who were seeking the top 40 young professionals and thought leaders who live or work in Oakland County, Michigan. Laura, among the class of 40, will be invited to attend the State of the County Address in February and will be acknowledged as a member of the Elite 40 Under 40. She will also receive an invitation to participate in Elite 40 Under 40 events, including an awards ceremony and roundtable discussions.

    Laura’s nomination focused on her professional achievements—particularly her role as Director of Interior Design for TMP Architecture, representing the youngest in that position over the firm’s 57-year history. Laura’s community involvement, professional contributions - including presentations and pro bono work with state and local groups—as well as honors and awards received, were also considered during the judging process.

  • Michigan DEQ’s responsibility to ensure public safety collapsed in Flint

    Posted on February 4, 2016 2:20pm

    By: Codi Kozacek, Circle of Blue

    Amid calls for his resignation, Michigan’s Republican Governor Rick Snyder issued repeated apologies this month for his administration’s role in transforming a plan to save money into one of the most dangerous drinking water emergencies in American history.

    Yet even as the governor defends himself in the rising political heat of the Flint water crisis, a management fire rages at the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality, the state agency charged with overseeing municipal water quality and safety.

    Since 1920, the United States has tracked instances of waterborne disease outbreaks in every state. In 1993, in the worst U.S. public drinking water supply emergency, 403,000 people were sickened and 54 people died following an outbreak of Cryptosporidium in Milwaukee’s water supply, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control. The source of the protozoan organism, which causes severe gastrointestinal distress, was never conclusively identified. A scientific consensus emerged that the contaminants were carried on melting Lake Michigan ice and livestock manure that flowed into a Milwaukee drinking water treatment plant.

    No other instance since 1993 of a waterborne threat from a public drinking water system in the United States is as serious as what is occurring in Flint. The extent of lead contamination and its long-term consequences for Flint citizens, especially for children, are not known.

    The contrast between the emergencies in Milwaukee and in Flint is striking. In Milwaukee, the disease-bearing organism slipped into the city’s water and was not recognized until hospitals, schools, employers, and pharmacies reported an unusual number of diarrhea cases. City officials reacted with a “boil water” alert, and changes in water quality monitoring and upstream management.

  • LPI’s Wyckoff and Madill shared placemaking expertise at the MTA annual conference in Jan. 2016

    Posted on February 4, 2016 1:22pm

    The Michigan Townships Association (MTA) hosted their annual conference Jan. 19-22, 2016, in Detroit. The 2016 Annual Educational Conference brought together about 1,000 officials for three days of educational and networking experiences. On Thursday, Jan. 21, 2016, the MSU Land Policy Institute and MSU Extension partnered to deliver two separate extended sessions on placemaking. Both sessions introduced placemaking and quality places, and then explored the relationship between placemaking and economic development, and what makes quality places. Practical tips on how to apply placemaking in a community, and how to start the process were given along with helpful resources that are available.

    The Land Policy Institute’s senior associate director Mark Wyckoff, and director of the Planning & Zoning Center at MSU; and Glenn Pape, extension educator for MSU Extension, presented Strategic Placemaking as an Economic Development Tool in Suburban Townships. The exercises that Wyckoff and Pape facilitated were used to help participants think about how to transform sometimes auto-centric suburbs into more walkable and people-oriented places.

    Holly Madill, outreach specialist for LPI; and Dean Solomon, senior educator for MSU Extension, presented Placemaking Projects to Improve Quality of Life in Your Township. The exercises that Madill and Solomon facilitated helped participants think about the interdependence of urban and rural places, and sparked discussion about how to capitalize on unique assets to encourage placemaking projects and activities.

  • Place-Based Development: What Developers and Communities Want

    Place-Based Development: What Developers and Communities Want

    Posted on February 4, 2016 1:06pm

    By: Mark Wyckoff, FAICP, MSU Land Policy Institute; and James Tischler, AICP, Michigan State Housing Development Authority

    Demographics are changing, markets are changing and communities are changing. Talented workers have skills that are in high demand, and they can live anywhere they want. They will not choose your community unless it is a high-quality place with a lot of amenities. Jobs increasingly locate where there are an abundance of talented workers. Thus, creating a quality place is the first step to talent and job attraction and improved economic competitiveness. But, developers will not build what is needed unless the community makes it easy for them to do so.

    Placemaking required to create quality places

    Placemaking is the process of creating quality places where people want to live, work, play and learn. There needs to be several quality places in each region for the region to be economically competitive. Creating quality places is a constant process of placemaking that focuses on public spaces and the interface of private spaces with public spaces (building facades, “build-to lines,” height and parking especially).

    Barriers: Limited master plans

    Most master plans are old or outdated. They are not based on contemporary analysis of demographic changes or informed by recent market trends. They focus primarily on land use and infrastructure and fail to consider urban form and the value of amenities (parks, trails, entertainment venues, well-equipped public spaces, good transit, etc.). In addition, they have no section on placemaking or priorities for public investments, and no clear guidance on plan implementation.

  • Student presenters to compete at Agriculture and Food Law Symposium on Feb. 12

    Posted on February 4, 2016 11:31am

    The Agricultural Law Section of the State Bar of Michigan and the Global Food Law Program at the Michigan State University College of Law are co-sponsoring the second annual Student Agriculture and Food Law Symposium on Friday, Feb. 12, in the Castle Boardroom.

  • CANR & MSU Extension faculty and staffers to be honored during MSU Awards Convocation

    Posted on February 2, 2016 2:01pm

    Two College of Agriculture and Natural Resources faculty members will be honored for their outstanding contributions to education and research with William J. Beal Outstanding Faculty Awards at the annual MSU Awards Convocation Feb. 9. Three MSU Extension staffers will be recognized with Distinguished Academic Staff Awards.

    Each year, William J. Beal Outstanding Faculty Award winners are honored for a comprehensive and sustained record of scholarly excellence in research and/or creative activities, instruction and outreach. The William J. Beal Outstanding Faculty Awards are supported by the Office of University Development.

    Distinguished Academic Staff Awards are presented to academic specialists and MSU Extension academic staff for extraordinary achievement, excellence and exceptional contributions in advising, curriculum development, outreach, extension, research and/or teaching. They are supported by the Office of University Development.

     

  • Annual Agriculture and Natural Resources Week slated at MSU

    Posted on January 28, 2016 8:13pm

    Looking for the latest in horticulture? How about some of the quietest outdoor activities? Maybe you’re already thinking spring.

     

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