Increasing consumer agriculture literacy from farm to table

Michigan State University Extension works to improve this disparity with programs such as Breakfast on the Farm, which provides an open door for consumers to learn about modern food production and meet the local farmers who produce it.

October 1, 2018

BOTF event

The number of farmers in the U.S. declines each year, representing less than 2 percent of the country’s population. This makes it difficult for farmers to personally interact with consumers, something that’s become increasingly important when more than 70 percent of U.S. consumers admit to knowing very little about farming. 

Michigan State University Extension works to improve this disparity with programs such as Breakfast on the Farm, which provides an open door for consumers to learn about modern food production and meet the local farmers who produce it. 

Since its debut in 2009, BOTF has hosted 38 on-farm events, providing thousands of visitors a free, farm-fresh breakfast, a self-guided walking tour of a farm in their community and the opportunity to learn more about agriculture and daily life on a modern farm. Visitors are also encouraged to ask questions about farming and food production.

  • 90% surveyed indicated they would talk to others about what they learned at BOTF.
  • 96% of first-time visitors surveyed indicated they have high or very high trust that dairy farmers will do the right things with regard to caring for their animals.
  • In the past nine years, more than 85,000 visitors have attended BOTF events.

Tags: agriculture: plants & animals

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