MSU doctoral student named Russell E. Train fellow

Herbert Kasozi, a doctoral student in the Research on the Ecology of Carnivores and their Prey (RECaP) Laboratory in the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, was named one of 24 Russell E. Train fellows by the World Wildlife Foundation.

November 7, 2017

Herbert Kasozi

Herbert Kasozi, a doctoral student in the Research on the Ecology of Carnivores and their Prey (RECaP) Laboratory in the Michigan State University (MSU) Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, was named one of 24 Russell E. Train fellows by the World Wildlife Foundation (WWF).

Kasozi, who hails from Uganda where he earned a master’s degree at Makerere University, joins other outstanding conservationists from 11 countries throughout Africa, Asia and Latin America whose collective work will “help build capacity for climate adaptation, increase the number of individuals working on sustainable food systems, and protect crucial ecosystems” throughout the world, according to WWF. Each individual was selected through a competitive, merit-based process from a pool of more than 150 applicants. 

“I am so grateful to be a Train Fellow as it has given be the incredible opportunity to pursue my Ph.D. at MSU. This is particularly exciting as it brings me one step closer to achieving my life-long ambition of being a professor of wildlife conservation.”

The fellowships are funded by the Russell E. Train Education for Nature Program (EFN). Train Fellows pursue graduate degrees in conservation-related fields anywhere in the world and then return to their home countries better equipped to take on global conservation challenges.

“The really exciting aspect of this fellowship is that it positions Herbert to be a research leader. Upon graduation from MSU, Herbert will join Makerere University as a professor of wildlife conservation where he will train the next generation of wildlife conservation leaders for Uganda, East Africa, and beyond," Robert Montgomery, Director of the RECaP Laboratory, said.

Train Fellowships are named after the late Russell E. Train, founder and chairman emeritus of WWF-US, who was profoundly committed to building local conservation leadership and institutions throughout the world. 

To date, EFN has provided nearly $20 million in financial support to build capacity of more than 1,900 individuals and funded 615 organizations to conduct training workshops, collectively reaching more than 55,000 community members, indigenous people, park guards, and others.

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