This 100-acre center sits in the five-county northwestern region that produces almost half of the U.S. supply of tart cherries and is responsible for 83 percent of sweet cherry production in Michigan.

Established 1979

This 100-acre center sits in the five-county northwestern region that produces almost half of the U.S. supply of tart cherries and is responsible for 83 percent of sweet cherry production in Michigan. Founded through the efforts of the northwestern Michigan area fruit industry, the center is the premier research site for integrated pest management, horticultural production and handling, value-added processing, marketing and farm financial management practices for sweet and tart cherries, wine grapes, apples, plums and hops. In addition to creating and expanding knowledge through leading-edge research on cherries and other fruits, the center disseminates state-of-the-art information to the Michigan fruit industry and the public.

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Public tour at MSU AgBioResearch center

MSU research centers to host public field days

Published on May 13, 2014

MSU AgBioResearch is inviting the public to tour several of its outlying research centers this summer.

There are 420 species of bees in Michigan. The more free pollinators attracted to farms, the better. Photo by Brett Blaauw

Attracting wild bees to farms is a good insurance policy

Published on April 4, 2014

A paper co-authored by MSU AgBioResearch's Rufus Isaacs gives farmers of pollination-dependent crops tangible results to convert marginal acreage to fields of wildflowers.

MSU scientists have identified how a single gene in honey bees separates the queens from the workers. Courtesy of Zachary Huang

Single gene separates queen from workers

Published on January 29, 2014

Scientists have identified how a single gene in honey bees separates the queens from the workers.

Fire blight of an apple tree

Controlling fire blight without antibiotics in organic apples goal of new USDA project

Published on December 20, 2013

A team of Michigan State University (MSU) researchers has begun investigating organic methods for controlling fire blight, a devastating apple and pear tree disease.

Adam Dietrich, MSU alumnus and grower at Leo Dietrich and Sons, is calling this year's apple crop

Apples - from bust to boon

Published on September 30, 2013

MSU researchers are helping Michigan apple growers maximize and improve storage techniques to make the most of this year's record harvest.

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