Qingwu Meng

Qingwu Meng

mengqin1@msu.edu
Cellphone: (517) 862-7541

Department of Horticulture

Ph.D. Graduate Research Assistant

1066 Bogue St, Room A154
East Lansing, MI 48824

Area of Expertise:

Controlled-environment agriculture, floriculture production, horticultural lighting, indoor vertical farming, LEDs


Degree:

M.S. in Horticulture


CV: File Download

 

EDUCATION

Ph.D. in Horticulture, Michigan State University, Dec. 2018 (expected)

Ph.D. in Multidisciplinary Science, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, May 2015 (transferred)

M.S. in Horticulture, Michigan State University, June 2014

B.E. in Agricultural Engineering and B.A. in English, China Agricultural University, June 2012

ABOUT ME

My academic and career goals revolve around one message: transforming horticulture with light. I strive to integrate plant science and engineering in agricultural lighting applications. I am currently pursuing a Ph.D. degree in Horticulture at Michigan State University under Dr. Erik Runkle's supervision and expect to graduate by December, 2018. Previously, I earned my Bachelor of Engineering and Bachelor of Arts at China Agricultural University as well as Master of Science in Horticulture at Michigan State University.

Horticulture lighting banner

I hope to work in academia or industry and bring about more innovations with my knowledge in photobiology, horticultural science, and lighting. My current research in the Controlled-Environment Lighting Laboratory aims at improving the growth and quality attributes of indoor-grown leafy greens and herbs through precise lighting control. Prior to this, using light-emitting didoes (LEDs) to regulate flowering of photoperiodic greenhouse ornamental crops was my specialty. Never have I limited my scope of horticultural lighting because light is such a powerful tool in growth and development of all plants. I am receptive and excited to expand my repertoire in future endeavors. On the side, I am the content creator of LightHort, a blog dedicated to communicating the latest scientific findings on light in horticulture.

RECENT RESEARCH

Producing premium-quality specialty food crops indoors using innovative LED lighting

This project focuses on how broad-spectrum LEDs with varying fractions of blue, green, red, and far-red light influence growth and quality attributes of leafy greens grown hydroponically indoors. Experiments are being conducted in the Controlled-Environment Lighting Laboratory using programmable multi-channel LED fixtures developed by OSRAM Innovation. We aim to further our understanding of how light quality affects whole-plant photosynthesis, plant morphology, and secondary metabolism and generate lighting guidelines for sole-source lighting applications in the vertical farming industry. These efforts include balancing produce nutritional value and flavor through light-mediated regulation of secondary compounds.

Enhancing lettuce and basil seedling growth indoors with far-red light

This project investigated how far-red light, when added to red and blue light, modulated growth, morphology, and pigmentation during indoor production of lettuce and basil seedlings. A low red-to-far-red ratio elicited shade-avoidance responses such as increased stem elongation and leaf expansion, which enabled the plant to capture more light for photosynthesis. The effects of far-red light depended on the dynamics of red and blue light. Far-red light was antagonistic to blue light when controlling plant phenotypes including extension growth and accumulation of chlorophylls and anthocyanins. Incorporating far-red light in sole-source lighting increases growth and allows manipulation of produce appearance.

Controlling flowering of photoperiodic greenhouse floriculture crops with green light

This project explored whether flowering could be regulated by green light, a waveband often regarded as an effective long day signal. Typically, photoperiodic control is achieved using low-intensity red and far-red light, which mediate phytochrome responses. Blue light does not create long days unless it is delivered at a sufficiently high intensity. Major photoreceptors responsible for flower induction absorb little green light. However, we found that green light controlled flowering of some, but not all, crops at a low intensity and controlled flowering of most crops at a moderately high intensity. We are currently using the model plant Arabidopsis to study how photoreceptors transduce green light for signaling of flowering.

HONORS AND AWARDS

1st place in the American Society for Horticultural Science (ASHS) Controlled Environment Working Group (CEWG) graduate student oral competition. Washington, D.C. 2018.

Travel grant from the American Society for Horticultural Science (ASHS). Washington, D.C. 2018.

Travel grant from the American Floral Endowment (AFE) Young Professional Council. Washington, D.C. 2018.

The Bukovac Outstanding Graduate Student in the Department of Horticulture. East Lansing, MI. 2018.

Travel assistance from the Committee on Controlled Environment Technology & Use (NCERA-101) regional working group meeting. Raleigh, NC. 2018.

1st place applied oral competition in the 16th Annual Michigan State University Plant Science Graduate Student Research Symposium. East Lansing, MI. 2018.

1st place in the American Society for Horticultural Science (ASHS) Controlled Environment Working Group (CEWG) graduate student oral competition. Waikoloa, HI. 2017.

1st place in the American Society for Horticultural Science (ASHS) Floriculture Working Group graduate student oral competition. Waikoloa, HI. 2017.

Travel grant from the American Society for Horticultural Science (ASHS). Waikoloa, HI. 2017.

1st place applied oral competition in the 15th Annual Michigan State University Plant Science Graduate Student Research Symposium. East Lansing, MI. 2017.

1st place applied poster competition in the 15th Annual Michigan State University Plant Science Graduate Student Research Symposium. East Lansing, MI. 2017.

The John L. Arend Excellence in Graduate Student Research Award. East Lansing, MI. 2017.

Best overall oral presentation in the 9th Annual Graduate Academic Conference at Michigan State University. East Lansing, MI. 2017.

Travel assistance from the Committee on Controlled Environment Technology & Use (NCERA-101) regional working group to attend the NCERA-101 meeting. Monterey, CA. 2017.

Full scholarship from the American Floral Endowment to attend the National Floriculture Forum. Philadelphia, PA. 2017.

3rd place in the American Society for Horticultural Science (ASHS) Controlled Environment Working Group (CEWG) graduate student oral competition. Atlanta, GA. 2016.

2nd place graduate student poster competition in the ISHS 8th International Symposium on Light in Horticulture. East Lansing, MI. 2016.

1st place applied oral competition in the 14th Annual Michigan State University Plant Science Graduate Student Research Symposium. East Lansing, MI. 2016.

1st place applied poster competition in the 14th Annual Michigan State University Plant Science Graduate Student Research Symposium. East Lansing, MI. 2016.

The Graduate Office Fellowship from Michigan State University Graduate School. East Lansing, MI. 2015.

1st place (tie) in the American Society for Horticultural Science (ASHS) Controlled Environment Working Group (CEWG) graduate student oral competition. New Orleans, LA. 2015.

1st place in the graduate student poster competition, Committee on Controlled Environment Technology & Use (NCERA-101) regional working group annual meeting. Fairbanks, AK. 2014.

1st place applied oral competition in the 12th Annual Michigan State University Plant Science Graduate Student Research Symposium. East Lansing, MI. 2014.

3rd place applied poster competition in the 12th Annual Michigan State University Plant Science Graduate Student Research Symposium. East Lansing, MI. 2014.

The John L. Arend Excellence in Graduate Student Research Award. East Lansing, MI. 2014.

JOURNAL PUBLICATIONS

Meng, Q. and E.S. Runkle. 2018. Regulation of flowering by green light depends on its photon flux density and involves cryptochromes. Physiol. Plant.

Owen, W.G., Q. Meng, and R.G. Lopez. 2018. Promotion of flowering from far-red radiation depends on the photosynthetic daily light integral. HortScience 53(4):465–471.

Meng, Q. and E.S. Runkle. 2017. Investigating the efficacy of white light-emitting diodes at regulating flowering of photoperiodic ornamental crops. Acta Hort. 1170:951–957.

Song, J., Q. Meng, W. Du, and D. He. 2017. Effects of light quality on growth and development of cucumber seedlings in controlled environment. Int. J. Agric. Biol. Eng. 10(3):312–318.

Meng, Q. and E.S. Runkle. 2017. Moderate-intensity blue radiation can regulate flowering, but not extension growth, of several photoperiodic ornamental crops. Environ. Exp. Bot. 134C:12–20.

Meng, Q. and E.S. Runkle. 2015. The role of blue light in night-interruption lighting of petunia. Acta Hort. 1107:101–105.

Meng, Q. and E.S. Runkle. 2015. Low-intensity blue light in night-interruption lighting does not influence flowering of herbaceous ornamentals. Sci. Hort. 186:230–238.

Meng, Q. and E.S. Runkle. 2014. Controlling flowering of photoperiodic ornamental crops with light-emitting diode lamps: A coordinated grower trial. HortTechnology 24:702–711.

BOOK CHAPTERS

Meng, Q. and E.S. Runkle. 2016. Control of flowering using night-interruption and day-extension LED lighting, p. 191–201. In: T. Kozai et al. (eds.). LED Lighting for Urban Agriculture. Springer Singapore, Singapore.

Mitchell, C.A., M.P. Dzakovich, C. Gomez, R. Lopez, J.F. Burr, R. Hernández, C. Kubota, C.J. Currey, Q. Meng, E.S. Runkle, C.M. Bourget, R.C. Morrow, and A.J. Both. 2015. Light-emitting diodes in horticulture, p. 1–88. In: J. Janick (ed.). Horticultural Reviews vol. 43. John Wiley & Sons, Hoboken, NJ.

THESES

Meng, Q. 2014. Investigating use of blue, red, and far-red light from light-emitting diodes to regulate flowering of photoperiodic ornamental crops. MS thesis, Dept. of Hort., Mich. State Univ., East Lansing, MI. ISBN 9781321026658.

Meng, Q. 2012. Light quality affects growth and development of cucumber seedlings in an enclosed transplant factory. BE thesis. Dept. of Agr. Structure Environ. Energy Eng., China Agr. Univ., Beijing, China.

EXTENSION ARTICLES

Meng, Q. 2017. Green light is more useful to plants than you might think. Urban Ag News.

Meng, Q. and E.S. Runkle. 2017. Far red is the new red. Inside Grower 2:26–30.

Meng, Q. and E.S. Runkle. 2016. Choosing the right LEDs to regulate flowering in greenhouses. Michigan State University Extension.

Meng, Q. and E.S. Runkle. 2015. Can white LEDs control flowering? Greenhouse Management 10:63–64.

Meng, Q. and E.S. Runkle. 2014. Evaluating different colors of LEDs to control flowering. Greenhouse Product News 12:14–19.

Meng, Q. and E.S. Runkle. 2014. Control flowering with LEDs. GrowerTalks 3:62–64.

FEATURED ARTICLES

Mekes, J.J. 2018. “There is no ‘one size fits all’ to growing plants indoors”. HortiDaily.

Whetstone, H. 2017. Growing food in the future. Futures Fall/Winter 14–17.

VIDEOS

Research missions of the Controlled-Environment Lighting Laboratory (video by OSRAM).

A peek into an experiment on lettuce and kale completed in late 2017 (video by me).

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