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Crabapple Selection Guide (E2177)

February 4, 2016 - Author: Curt Peterson

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Flowering crabapples are among the most popular ornamental trees. Few woody plants offer so many all-season values as these trees.

This easy-to-use guide can help you select the crabapple best suited for your planting site. Eighty-five species and cultivars are listed, with information on disease resistance and ornamental traits—size, shape and color of flowers and fruit. Also included are helpful tips on which typed of tree to plant in certain areas of your landscape.

Crabapple Selection Criteria

If the tree is to be—

Select trees with—

Close to the viewer

Fragrant flowers

Small fuits

Red fruits

Persistent fruits

Detailed blossoms (double, bicolor)

Medium to small size (unless desired for shade)

Far from the viewer

Large fruits

Yellow fruits

Medium to large size

Seen against red or dark brown stone or brick background

White flowers

Yellow fruits

Yellow fall color

Seen against light brown or tan stone or brick and natural cedar

White flowers

Red fruits

Medium to large size

Seen against blue sky

White or red flowers

Red fruits

Medium to large size

Seen with sunshine from behind the viewer

White flowers

Yellow fruits

Seen against a white or generally light background

Red or rosy flowers

Red fruits

Planted on a hillside or small slope

Semi-weeping

Weeping or a very wide spreader

Planted overhanging water, a rock wall or terrace

Semi-weeping

Weeping or a very wide spreader

Planted overhanging water, a rock wall or terrace

Horizontal spreading

Semi-weeping

Weeping

Planted near walkways, drives or tight corners

Upright to columnar

Fragrant

(Courtesy of John J. Sabuco, landscape architect and president of the Internal Ornamental Crabapple Society.)

Selecting Crabapples for the Landscape

To select a good crabapple tree, look for desirable ornamental traits plus the least amount of disease susceptibility.

R=Round
U=Upright (Narrow)
W=Weeping
U=Upright (Spreading)
S=Shrub

Ornamental Traits

Flowers

In the spring, the showy blossoms make their appearance before the lilacs bloom. Although the actual time of bloom will vary from year to year, depending on temperature, a total blom period of up to four weeks can be expected. Very-early blooming crabapples may flower as early as the star magnolia, while late bloomers may coincide with the black locust. The bloom period of an individual cultivar may vary from two days to almot two weeks depending on weather conditions.

Crabapple buds may be pink, white or red, and open blossoms may be white to dark purplish red, with many variations in between. Most crabapples have single flowers, but a few have semi-double or double blossoms.

Some cultivars bloom heavily only every other year. Avoid these alternate-bearing trees. The majority of crabapple cultivars produce consistent flower displays each year.

Foliage

Most crabapples have attractive green foliage. Some have a distinct reddish or bronze leaf color for the first month or so of the growing season. Most crabapple cultivars do not have especially attractive fall colors.

Fruits

A flowering crabapple is defined as any apple (genus Malus) with fruit 2 inches or less in diameter. The color of the ¼- to 2-inch fruits ranges from bright red to purple and bright yellow to orange, with intermediate shades and combinations. Fruits of some cultivars begin to color in August, while the fruits of others do not reach their true color until September or October.

The fruits of some cultivars ripen and drop by the end of August, but the fruits of others may still be present in the spring. Cultivars with fruits persisting into winter can add a good deal of color to the eaerly winter landscape. Birds may eat these fruits in winter.

Fruits follow the flowers, so alternate-bearing cultivars will fruit heavily only in those yhears when they produce many flowers.

Growth Habit

Flowering crabapples can be less than 20 feet tall, but some may grow to 30 or 40 feet. Most crabapples are rounded and dense, but growth habit varies widely from narrowly upright to weeping. In summer, each form of crabapple lends a distinctive character to the landscape, and the twisted limbs of older specimens add a picturesque beauty to the winter scene. The various plant forms, flowers and fruit colors make crabapples a very useful species in the landscape.

Diseases

Disease susceptibility or resistance should be given as much consideration as the ornamental traits when selecting a crabapple. Four diseases—apple scab, fire blight, cedar-apple rust and powdery mildew—are the major disease problems affecting crabapples.

Apple Scab

Apple scab causes the leaves to turn yellow and drop prematurely in mid- to late-summer. The fruits will usually have sunken, corky, dark olive areas.

This fungal disease attacks many species, including crabapple, apple, mountain ash, pear, pyracantha and quince. The disease in some years can completely cover leaves of susceptible cultivars. Such sever infections, referred to as “sheet scab,” will defoliate an entire tree. The loss of infected leaves weakens the tree. Scab can defoliate a tree several times in one season.

The scab fungus forms two types of spores. The first type is formed on fallen leaves of the previous year and is blown about in the wind. It causes the first infections in the spring. These infections form a second type of spore that is spread by rain splash and infects only the same plant or nearby plants of the same species. The more rainy the season is, the more the disease spreads throughout adjacent plants.

If you can prevent the first type of spore from infecting the plant in early to midspring, the plant will escape further infections htat season.

This disease is not fatal but requires regular sprays from bud-break through mid-June. Fungicides labeled for use on crabapple for scab include chlorothalonil (Daconil 2787) and benomyl (Benlate). Apply a fungicide when swollen flower buds show one-half inch of green tissue. Follow withapplications, as needed, to protect the plant throughout the blooming period whenever dew or rain threatens to wet leaves for 6, or more, hours.

Cultural controls include raking and burning fallen leaves before spring and replacing highly susceptible cultivars with resistant cultivars.

Fire Blight

Fire blight is a bacterial disease that causes leaves to blacken and hang on the tree. As the bacteria spread to larger branches, more of the tree dies and the bark of infected branches becomes wrinkled and peels. This disease is usually fatal—there is no effective chemical control. Shoots often have bent, drooped tips and resemble a shepherd’s crook.

Bacteria generally cause blights during wet weather in early spring when buds are breaking. Warm spring weather favors fire blight on crabapples.

In wet spring weather, cankers formed during previous infections ooze droplets of bacteria. The bacteria are splashed by rain and blown about as mists, or insects may visit the attractive ooze and carry it about. infections usually begin either through nectaries of flowers or through the microscopic pores (stomates) in leaves.

Avoid using high-nitrogen fertilizers on susceptible cultivars. Such fertilizers can increase susceptibility to fire blight.

Cedar-Apple Rust

Cedar-apple rust is aptly named—it causes rust-colored spots on the leaves. In late summer, brownish clusters of threads or cylindrical tubes appear beneath the yellow leaf spots, or on fruits and twigs. The spores formed in the threads or tubes infect the leaves and twigs of junipers during wet, warm weather in late summer and early fall.

Galls and swellings on the junipers appear about seven months later and form gelatinous masses of spores after about 18 months. Rust is very conspicuous red cedar and other junipers during spring when the galls are covered with the orange-brown, gelatinous masses. Rust spores formed on the junipers can not affect other junipers but will infect twigs and leaves of crabapples. The galls on junipers will produce spores for only one year. The gelatinous masses are usually seen in the spring, after a period of warm, rainy weather.

This problem is less serious than the previous two and can be controlled with fungicides. Chlorothalonil (Daconil 2787) is labeled for controlling rust.

Cultural controls include getting rid of nearby junipers and planting resistant crabapples cultivars.

Powdery Mildew

Powdery mildew is the least serious of the four diseases. The white, powdery coating on the leaves may not be seen in most years. This is the only fungal disease in which the fungus grows on the surface of the plant. There it forms a superficial, white, powdery coating on leaves, buds, shoots and flower petals. The entire leaf surface may be covered with a cottony spider webbing, most of which consists of spores ready to be blown to uninfected leaves. The fungus can easily be wiped off the surface.

Powdery mildew is a disease of mid-to late-summer. It is most serious in shady, damp locations where plants are crowded, air circulation is poor and relative humidity is high. Powdery mildews flourish when days are warm and nights are cool, and when dew forms on the leaves.

The disease is easily controlled with fungicides such as benomyl (Benlate) or lime-sulfur.

Ornamental Traits and Susceptibility to Diseases of Crabapple Species and Cultivars

The table below lists crabapple species and cultivars and shows their ornamental traits and apple scab susceptibility. To use “Flower” column: The left side lists the color of the flower bud to the left of the slash (/) mark and the color of the open flower to the right. The part of the column indicates whether the flowers are single (sgl) or double (dbl).

Form Codes
P=Pyramidal
R=Round
S=Spreading
U=Upright
W=Weeping

Apple Scab Codes

PA= Ratings from Pennsylvania State University
        Ratings are from 1985. Ratings are SL=slight, M=moderate, SV=severe, VS=very severe
        Ratings were not defined in terms of how trees looked.

IL= Ratings from Morton Arboretum
       Ratings are for 1986. Ratings are SL=slightly susceptible, M=moderately susceptible, SV=severely susceptible, VS=very severely susceptible, NS=not susceptible.
        Ratings are the worst observed under conditions that best promote the disease.

OH= Ratings from Ohio State University
         Ratings listed are the worst rating for the four years 1983-1986.
         Rating system used is HR=highly resistant—no indication of disease; R=resistant—mild infection with no defoliation; S=susceptible—medium infection with only slight defoliation; HS=highly susceptible—heavy infection often accompanied by considerable defoliation.

MI= Ratings from Michigan State University
        The ratings listed are for 1976. The rating scale is R=resistant, T=tolerant (leaves become infected but no defoliation), S=susceptible (trees are defoliated).

Species and Cultivars

Hgt.

Spread

Form

Flower

Fruit Size

Fruit Color

Apple scab*

Comments

Buds/Open

Type

PA

IL

OH

MI

Adams

20’

20’

R

Red/pink

Sgl

¼”

Red

M

M

R

 

An annual bearer of carmine flowers that fade to pink. The fruits persist until spring. Fall foliage display is yellow to orange.

Almey

25’

20’

U

Red/pink

Sgl

1”

Red

 

 

HS

 

Not recommended because of severe scab susceptibility.

American Beauty

30’

20’

U

Red/red

Dbl

½”

Red

 

 

HS

S

Not recommended because of severe scab susceptibility.

X atrosanguinea

20’

20’

S

Red/pink

Sgl

3/8”

Red/yel

 

 

HS

 

The red and yellow fruits have little ornamental value. Reported to be both diseases resistant and susceptible

Autumn Glory

20’

15’

U

Red/white

Sgl

¼”

Red

 

 

 

 

Flowers profusely with good fragrance

Baccata

30’

30’

R

Pink/white

Sgl

3/8”

Red/yel

 

 

S

 

An annual bearer with excellent cold hardiness.

Baccata ‘Columnaris’

30’

10’

U

White/white

Sgl

½”

Red/yel

 

 

S

T

One of the most upright crabapples. Susceptibility to fire blight may limit its use.

Baccata ‘Jackii’

20’

20’

U

White/white

Sgl

½”

Red

 

NS

R

R

The long-stemmed fruits persist into winter. Excellent cold hardiness and scab resistance. Reported to be fire blight susceptible.

Baccata var. mandshurica

30’

30’

R

White/white

Sgl

½”

Red

SV

SV

S

 

Not recommended because of sever scab susceptibility.

Barbara Ann

20’

20’

R

Pink/pink

Dbl

½”

Red

 

 

HS

T

Not recommended because of severe scab susceptibility.

Baskatong

25’

25’

R

Red/red

Sgl

1”

Red

SL

SL

 

 

The relatively large fruits do not persist so may be messy.

Beverly

20’

20’

R

Red/pink

Sgl

5/8”

Red

 

NS

R

R

Susceptibility to fire blight limits this tree’s usefulness. The tree flowers heavily only every other year.

Bob White

20’

20’

R

Red/white

Sgl

5/8”

Yel

 

NS

HR

 

The yellow fruits turn red after frost and persist well into winter. A cultivar worth considering. Attractive to many bird species.

Brandywine

20’

25’

R

Red/pink

Dbl

1 ½”

Yel

M

M

S

 

The litter problem caused by the large fruits outweighs the flower display. Better cultivars are available.

Candied Apple

15’

15’

W

Red/pink

Sgl

5/8”

Red

 

M

S

 

The branches are horizontal to weeping and the leaves have a tinge of red. The fruits perist into December.

Centurion

25’

20’

U

Red/pink

Sgl

5/8”

Red

SV

SV

HS

 

A narrow, upright tree with glossy, dark green leaves. The fruits persist for about 2 months.

Coralburst

10’

15’

R

Pink/pink

Dbl

½”

Brown

SV

SV

R

 

A dwarf cultivar useful for small spaces. The fruits are not ornamental.

Coral Cascade

15’

15’

W

Red/white

Sgl

3/8”

Pink

 

 

 

 

Flowers heavily; unusual fruit color

Crimson Brilliant

15’

15’

S

Red/red

Sgl

3/4”

Red

 

 

HS

 

The foliage has a purplish tinge. The tree is an alternate bearer and so flowers heavily only every other year.

David

15’

20’

R

Pink/white

Sgl

½”

RED

M

M

HR

T

The foliage partially conceals the flowers that are borne heavily only every other year. Reported to be susceptible to fire blight.

Dolgo

40’

30‘

R

Pink/white

Sgl

1 ½”

Red

M

M

HR

S

The fruits ripen in July and drop soon after. The tree is an alternate bearer.

Donald Wyman

20’

20’

R

Pink/white

Sgl

3/8”

Red

M

M

R

 

The fruits persist in good condition throughout the winter. Reported to be fire blight susceptible.

Golden Hornet

25’

15’

S

Pink/white

Sgl

½”

Yel

SV

SV

HR

T

Reported to be fire blight susceptible.

Gwendolyn

20’

30’

S

Pink/pink

Sgl

¾”

Red

 

 

HR

 

Delicate pink flowers with good fragrance. Reported to be susceptible to fire blight.

Halliana var. parkmanii

15’

15’

R

Red/pink

Dbl

¼”

Red

 

 

HR

 

A small tree with pink flowers but few fruits because the flowers are double.

Harvest Gold

20’

15’

U

White/white

Sgl

3/8”

Yel

SV

 

R

 

A vigorous, upright tree bearing yellow fruits that persist into winter. Reported to be susceptible to fire blight.

Henningii

25’

15’

U

Pink/white

Sgl

5/8”

Orn

SL

SL

R

 

An upright, spreading tree that flowers heavily.

Henry Kohnakie

20’

20’

R

Pink/white

Sgl

1 ¼”

Red

SL

SL

 

 

The large, red fruits persist into winter and can be used in jelly.

Hopa

20’

25’

S

Red/pink

Sgl

1”

Red

 

 

HS

S

An upright tree when young that spreads with age. Disease susceptibility limits the usefulness of this old favorite

Hupehensis

20’

25’

U

Pink/white

Sgl

3/8”

Yel/red

 

NS

HR

R

A vase-shaped tree with an interesting branching pattern. The tree blooms heavily only in alternate years. Reported to be fire blight susceptible.

Indian Magic

15’

15’

R

Red/pink

Sgl

½”

Red

VS

VS

S

T

The orange-red fruits turn brown in the winter and then persist until spring.

Indian Summer

20’

20’

R

Red/red

Sgl

5/8”

Red

SV

SV

S

 

This cultivar blooms heavily even when young.

Jewelberry

10’

10’

R

Pink/white

Sgl

½”

Red

SL

SL

R

 

A dwarf tree that holds its fruit into December.

Klehm’s improved

25’

20’

U

Pink/pink

Dbl

1”

Green

 

 

S

 

The green fruits are seldom produced on this double-flowered cultivar. Blooms late in this season.

Katherine

20’

20’

S

White/white

Dble

½”

Yel

 

 

HS

 

The large, white flowers may be more numerous in alternate years. The greenish yellow fruits are not ornamental.

Liset

15’

15’

R

Red/red

Sgl

¾”

Red

M

M

HR

 

The young foliage is purplish green, becoming green with age

Louisa

15’

15’

W

Pink/pink

Sgl

3/8”

Yel

 

 

 

 

A good weepin form with glossy green leaves.

Madonna

20’

10’

U

White/white

Dbl

½”

Yel

 

 

R

 

The large double flowers are long lasting. The bronze-colored new growth adds additional interest. Reported to be susceptible to fire blight.

Mary Potter

10’

10’

S

Pink/white

Sgl

3/8”

Red

SV

SV

S

R

The flowers may be produced heavily only every other year. The red fruits persist and are attractive to birds.

Molten Lava

15’

15’

W

Red/white

Sgl

3/8”

Red

 

 

R

 

The red fruits persist in good condition into December.

Mount Arbor Special

20’

25’

S

Red/pink

Sgl

3/4”

Red

 

 

 

 

The new foliage is bronze but turns green. The flower petals are separated, giving a star-like appearance.

Oekonomierat Echtermeyer

15’

15’

W

Red/white

Sgl

1”

Red

 

 

HS

S

A small weeping tree with purplish young foliage turning green with age.

Ormiston Roy

20’

25’

S

Pink/white

Sgl

3/8”

Yel

SL

SL

HR

 

The tree is upright when young but becomes more spreading with age. The fruits persist into late winter. Reported to be susceptible to fire blight.

Pink Perfection

20’

20’

R

Red/pink

Dbl

½”

Yel

 

 

HS

S

The yellow fruits are insignificant.

Pink Spires

20’

10’

U

Pink/pink

Sgl

½”

Red

 

 

HS

 

The foliage is purple in the spring

Prairiefire

20’

20’

R

Red/red

Sgl

½”

Red

 

NS

HR

 

The young foliage is purple, becoming dark green with purple veins with age.

Professor Spenger

20’

20’

U

Pink/white

Sgl

½”

Orn-red

SL

SL

HR

 

The tree is extremely dense, and the distinctively colored fruits remain on the tree until a hard frost.

Profusion

20’

20’

R

Red/pink

Sgl

½”

Red

SV

SV

S

 

The young foliage is purplish and the red fruits persist into winter.

X purpruea Eleyi

20’

20’

R

Red/red

Sgl

¾”

Red

 

 

HS

 

The tree blooms heavily only every other year.

Radiant

20’

20’

R

Red/pink

Sgl

½”

Red

 

 

HS

S

Another cultivar with purplish young foliage

Ralph Shay

20’

30’

S

Pink/white

Sgl

1 5/8”

Red

 

 

S

 

The flowers are fragrant heavy fruit loads cause the form to become more weeping.

Red Baron

20’

10’

U

Red/red

Sgl

½”

Red

SV

SV

R

 

The dark red flowers are displayed on a narrowly upright form. The fall foliage display is bright red.

Red Jade

15’

15’

W

Pink/white

Sgl

½”

Red

SV

SV

S

T

The red fruits persist into winter and are attractive to birds. Reported to be fire blight susceptible.

Red Jewel

15’

10’

U

White/white

Sgl

½”

Red

M

M

R

 

The bright red fruits persist into early winter then darken and stay on the tree until spring. Reported to be very fire blight susceptible.

Red Silver

20’

15’

R

Red/red

Sgl

¾’

Red

 

 

HS

 

Disease susceptibility and alternate year flowering limit its use.

Red Snow

10’

10’

W

Red/white

Sgl

5/16”

Red

 

 

 

 

The dark green leaves are displayed on unusually long arching branches.

Red Splendor

20’

20’

S

Red/pink

Sgl

1/2”

Red

VS

VS

HS

 

The ornamental red fruits persist into winter.

Robinson

25’

25’

R

Red/pink

Sgl

3/8”

RD

SV

SV

HS

 

The fruits are not displayed well against the purplish foliage. Reported to be susceptible to fire blight.

Royal Ruby

15’

10’

U

Red/pink

Dbl

3/8”

Red

 

 

HS

S

This double-flowered cultivar produces few fruits

Royalty

15’

15’

R

Red/red

Sgl

½”

Red

VS

VS

HS

S

A good choice for purplish foliage, but its use is limited by disease susceptibility (susceptible to fire blight).

Sargentii

10’

10’

S

Red/white

Sgl

¼”

Red

 

NS

HR

T

A dense, shrubby plant that is usually wider than it is tall.

Sargentii Tina

5

10

S

White/white

Sgl

¼”

Red

 

NS

 

 

A useful tree or shrub of small stature. The small fruits are ornamental but do not create a litter problem.

X scheideckeri

15’

10’

U

Pink/pink

Dbl

½”

Yel/orn

 

 

HS

 

Alternate bearing and disease susceptibility limit the use of this cultivar.

Selkirk

20’

20’

R

Pink/pink

Sgl

¾”

Red

SV

SV

S

 

The bright red fruits are effective from mid summer into fall.

Sentinel

20’

15’

U

Red/pink

Sgl

½”

Red

M

M

HR

 

A narrow, upright form with fruits that stay on the tree into winter after the leaves drop in the fall.

Silver Moon

20’

15’

U

Pink/pink

Sgl

3/8”

Red

M

M

HR

 

This cultivar has purple foliage and a narrow, upright habit. Heavy flowering may occur only every other year. Very susceptible to fire blight.

Snowcloud

20’

15’

U

Pink/white

Sgl

½”

Yel

 

 

HS

S

The yellow fruits are too sparse to be ornamental.

Snowdrift

20’

20’

R

Pink/white

Sgl

3/8”

Orn

SV

SV

S

R

The flowers are produced in abundance and the orange fruits persist after the leaves drop off in the fall. Reported to be fire blight susceptible.

Sparkler

15’

25’

S

Red/red

Sgl

1/3”

Red

 

 

HS

S

The red flowers are displayed on a very spreading growth habit.

Spring Snow

20’

15’

R

White/white

Sgl

 

 

 

 

HS

 

The tree produces few to no fruits. Watch out for disease problems.

Strawberry Parfait

20’

25’

U

Red/pink

Sgl

3/8”

Yel

 

 

 

 

The young foliage is reddish purple, becoming green as it gets older.

Sugar Tyme

20’

15’

U

Red/white

Sgl

½”

Red

SL

M

HR

 

An oval form that is covered with shite flowers in spring. The red fruits can persist until the following spring.

Toringoides

25’

20’

P

White/white

Sgl

¾”

Yel

 

 

HS

 

The pear-shaped fruits are considered to be the most ornamental feature of this tree.

Tschonoskii

30’

15’

P

White/white

Sgl

1”

Yel

SL

SL

HR

R

The foliage is silvery in spring; in fall, it is shades of yellow, orange, red and purple. Reported to be very susceptible to fire blight.

Van Eseltine

20’

10’

U

Pink/pink

Dbl

¾”

Yel

 

 

HS

T

The flowers may be produced heavily only every other year. The fruits are neither persistent nor ornamental.

Velvet Pillar

20’

15’

U

Pink/pink

Sgl

½”

Red

 

 

HS

 

The upright form is combined with purple leaves. Few fruits are produced and the plant can be used in hedges.

White Angel

20’

20’

R

White/white

Sgl

5/8”

Red

SL

SL

HR

R

The tree produces abundant crops of both flowers and fruits

White Cascade

15’

15’

W

Pink/white

Sgl

3/8”

Yel

M

M

HS

 

A useful tree where a weeping form is desired.

White Candle

15’

10’

U

Pink/white

Dbl

5/8”

Red

 

 

HS

R

The upright form and flowering are the primary ornamental traits. Few fruits are produced.

Winter Gold

25’

25’

R

Red/white

Sgl

½”

Yel

VS

VS

HS

 

The yellow fruits persist and are an outstanding ornamental trait but may be abundant only  in alternate years.

Yellow Jewel

15’

15’

R

White/white

Sgl

½”

Yel

SV

SV

 

 

A small, shrub-like tree.

Yunnanensis var. veitchii

20’

10’

U

White/white

Sgl

½”

Pur

 

 

 

R

The flowers are borne in dense clusters. The fruits are held erect on stiff stems.

X zumi Calocarpa

20’

20’

R

Pink/white

Sgl

3/8”

Red

SL

SL

HR

T

A rounded, spreading tree with fruits that may persist until spring. Reproted to be susceptible to fire blight.

Form Codes
P=Pyramidal
R=Round
S=Spreading
U=Upright
W=Weeping

Apple Scab Codes

PA= Ratings from Pennsylvania State University
        Ratings are from 1985. Ratings are SL=slight, M=moderate, SV=severe, VS=very severe
        Ratings were not defined in terms of how trees looked.

IL= Ratings from Morton Arboretum
       Ratings are for 1986. Ratings are SL=slightly susceptible, M=moderately susceptible, SV=severely susceptible, VS=very severely susceptible, NS=not susceptible.
        Ratings are the worst observed under conditions that best promote the disease.

OH= Ratings from Ohio State University
         Ratings listed are the worst rating for the four years 1983-1986.
         Rating system used is HR=highly resistant—no indication of disease; R=resistant—mild infection with no defoliation; S=susceptible—medium infection with only slight defoliation; HS=highly susceptible—heavy infection often accompanied by considerable defoliation.

MI= Ratings from Michigan State University
        The ratings listed are for 1976. The rating scale is R=resistant, T=tolerant (leaves become infected but no defoliation), S=susceptible (trees are defoliated).

Other Publications

There are many other publications about ornamental plants available from your Cooperative Extensive Service at Michigan State University. Just visit your county office for a copy of these bulletins, or write to:

MSU Bulletin Office
Michigan State University
10-B Agricultural Hall
East Lansing, MI 48824-1039

Listed below are some of the available publications that may be of interest to you.

E-786, Fertilizing Shade and Ornamental Trees (85c)
E-804, Pruning Shade and Ornamental Trees (35c)
E-1818, A Gardener’s Guide to Shrubs ($3.00)
E-1936, Selecting Ornamental Plants for Michigan Landscapes (Single copy free to Michigan residents)
E-1947, Planning and Care of Ornamental Landscape Plants (35c)
E-1984, Growing Perennial (30c)
E-2024, Diagnosing Problems of Ornamental Landscape Plants (65c)

Tags: fruit & nuts, landscaping, lawn & garden


Related Topic Areas

Landscaping, Fruit & Nuts, Lawn & Garden

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