Revitalizing neighborhoods with pollinator education, community spaces

Detroit is transforming every single day. One neighborhood key to the city’s evolution is Brightmoor. Its biggest champion is Rosalyn Flint, a community activist and local business owner, who is spearheading the Cross Pollination Corridor Project.

October 1, 2018

Pollinator

Detroit is transforming every single day. One neighborhood key to the city’s evolution is Brightmoor. Its biggest champion is Rosalyn Flint, a community activist and local business owner, who is spearheading the Cross Pollination Corridor Project. The project involves renovating a once-blighted area to build learning and community spaces to educate residents about the importance of pollinators and the ways they contribute to the sustainability of the food and ecosystems. The next phase of the project, the Bee Educational Center, will have live honey bees, documentaries, and lectures by apiarists and other pollinator experts. The corridor project will also be a key partner to Michigan State University’s newly launched Detroit Partnership for Food, Learning and Innovation, Michigan’s first urban food and agriculture research center.

Cross Pollinator Corridor Project phases:

  • Phase I: Opening of the Urban Country Meeting House (opened in 2015)
  • Phase II: Bee Educational Center (completion in 2018)
  • Phase III: Butterfly Art Studio
  • Phase IV: Bat House, Meditation Garden and activities

Tags: community & youth development

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