Demand for Imported-Frozen versus Domestic-Traditionally Processed Fish in Africa: Panel Data Evidence from Nigeria

February 1, 2018 - Author: L.S.O. Liverpool-Tasie, A. Sanou, T. Reardon

L.S.O. Liverpool-Tasie, A. Sanou, T. Reardon. 2018. Demand for Imported-Frozen versus Domestic-Traditionally Processed Fish in Africa: Panel Data Evidence from Nigeria. Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Food Security Policy Research Brief 57. East Lansing: Michigan State University

HIGHLIGHTS

  • Fish consumption in Nigeria is higher in the richer South than the poorer North.
  • Fish consumption is surprisingly similar in urban and rural areas, controlling for the region. Rural fish consumption (as well as that of the North in general) is heavily skewed toward traditional forms (dried, smoked) and somewhat less frozen/imported.
  • Fish consumption is found to be relatively expenditure inelastic (compared with poultry and milk), thus signaling “perception as necessity” by consumers.
  • Among fish forms, traditional forms such as dried and smoked fish tend to be income inelastic while the modern frozen fish form is income elastic.
  • Currently imported frozen fish prices are much higher than fresh domestic fish or the fresh equivalent price of dried fish. This creates opportunities for domestic fish production to compete with imports.

Tags: agrifood system transformation, c4b, fsp policy brief, nutrition


Related Topic Areas

Nigeria, C4b, FSP Nutrition Dataset


Authors

Saweda Liverpool-Tasie

Saweda Liverpool-Tasie
517-432-5418
lliverp@msu.edu

Thomas Reardon

Thomas Reardon
reardon@msu.edu


For more information visit:

FOOD SECURITY GROUP
Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Food Security Policy

Michigan State University Michigan State University Close Menu button Menu and Search button Open Close