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Fruit & Nuts

Animal Agriculture

Gardening in Michigan

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  • Small Fruit and Hop Pathology

    The Small Fruit and Hop Pathology program strives to understand the plant pathogens that threaten small fruit and hop production in Michigan. Our overall goal is to develop improved disease management practices for these exciting and novel crops.

  • Basics of Small Fruit Production

    Published on January 11, 2016

    Getting started with small fruit production

  • Considerations for growing backyard small fruit

    Published on February 1, 2018
    Growing backyard small fruit takes a commitment to soil preparation and multiple years of care before you can harvest a crop.

  • Lab Position - Small Fruit and Hop Pathology Lab

    Hiring Organization: MSU PSM Department (Pathology Lab)
    Employment type: Seasonal
    Application Deadline: May 1, 2020
    Job Location: East Lansing, MI

  • Assistant Professor of Horticulture - Small Fruit Extension Specialist

    Hiring Organization: University of Georgia
    Employment type: Full-Time
    Application Deadline: December 15, 2020
    Job Location: Tifton Area, GA

  • Pruning Small Fruits

    Published on March 13, 2019

    Getting started with pruning small fruits.

  • Field Position - Small Fruit and Hop Pathology Lab

    Hiring Organization: MSU PSM Department (Pathology Lab)
    Employment type: Seasonal
    Application Deadline: May 15, 2020
    Job Location: East Lansing, MI

  • Central Michigan small fruit report

    Published on April 26, 2011
    Quick overview of the impacts of environmental conditions this spring on small fruit in the Allegan and Ottawa County area.

  • Considerations for growing backyard small fruit

    Published on February 1, 2018
    Smart gardeners implement these considerations to successfully grow backyard small fruit.

  • Irrigation on Small Farms

    Published on April 28, 2016

    Getting started with irrigation on small farms.

  • West Central Michigan small fruit report

    Published on May 3, 2011
    Read the update and join us for our second Twilight meeting update on May 5 in West Olive.

  • 2008 small fruit insect summary

    Published on September 16, 2008

  • West Central Michigan small fruit report

    Published on May 10, 2011
    Read the update and join us June 1 for a training workshop on spotted wing Drosophila in West Olive.

  • Managing spotted wing Drosophila in organic small fruit

    Published on December 13, 2016
    Michigan State University releases new resource on useful information for managing spotted wing Drosophila in organic small fruit production.

  • Integrated Strategies for Management of Spotted Wing Drosophila in Organic Small Fruit Production

    Published on December 13, 2016
    Cultural, biological and chemical control of spotted wing Drosophila in organic small fruit crops.

  • Mar 30

    CANCELED: Preseason Fruit Update

    March 30, 2020 – April 2, 2020

    Preseason update for fruit growers on insect and disease control in fruit crops.

  • Fruit flies

    Fruit flies lay eggs near the surface of fermenting berries. Eggs take only 30 hours to hatch, and larvae develop in fermenting material. They feed near the surface, mostly on yeast, for 5 to 6 days and go to drier places to pupate.

  • Changes in small fruit weed control registrations for 2019

    Published on April 11, 2019
    Prowl is no longer labeled for use in blueberry and caneberry. New herbicide labels for small fruit crops should provide better weed suppression.

  • Honey Fruit Spread

    Published on September 9, 2016
    Honey is a great natural sweetener to add to any of your favorite dishes. It contains throat-soothing properties and nutrients that give you energy. Michigan State University Extension provides education that helps people buy and prepare healthy, budget-friendly foods as well as live a balanced, healthy lifestyle. Because honey is sweeter than sugar, use less of it for the same sweet taste. Honey is full of vitamins, minerals and antioxidants, making it not only a great natural source of energy but also a boost for your immune system. Pollination occurs when bees fly from flower to flower, helping fruits and vegetables to reproduce. Farmers markets often obtain honey from bees that pollinate local crops. Much of the honey you buy from the supermarket is highly filtered to give it a clear appearance. Read the label to find out where the honey comes from and whether it is 100 percent pure honey.

  • Root Fruit Salad

    Published on December 4, 2020
    This salad shows that you really can eat a rainbow, with fruits and vegetables!