Separate tags by commas.

Clear

Showing results for content tagged 'greenhouse temperature management'. Search instead for the keyword 'greenhouse temperature management'.


  • Heidi Lindberg

    West Michigan Greenhouse and Nursery Education & Research
    wollaege@msu.edu
    616-994-4701

  • The perils of low (greenhouse) temperature

    Published on February 13, 2020
    There can be some undesirable and insidious consequences if the temperature is lowered too much, or for too long. This article describes some of the pros and cons that can arise from low temperatures, especially in the greenhouse.

  • Greenhouse environment checklist

    Published on October 10, 2019
    Every autumn, ensure greenhouse systems that regulate the major environmental parameters are working well and positioned properly. This article highlights many of the control systems and equipment to check.

  • Common plant production acronyms

    Published on May 8, 2020
    This article briefly defines 20 acronyms (abbreviations formed from the initial letters of other words) commonly used when discussing controlled-environment production of plants.

  • High tunnel and outdoor production of cold-tolerant bedding plants

    Published on November 10, 2016
    As greenhouse space becomes limited in the spring, you may consider using outdoor spaces and high tunnels. Read on for insight into the benefits and risks associated with these growing strategies.

  • Temperature and light on bedding plants

    Published on July 29, 2003
    Michigan State University research shows what effects temperature and daily light integral have on bedding plant production.

  • Dealing with high temperatures

    Published on May 17, 2014
    Some of the most common heat-stress symptoms on ornamentals include lower-leaf yellowing, thin and elongated growth, delayed flowering, and small flowers.

  • Controlling height with temperature drops

    Published on April 17, 2009
    Temperature drop is the practice of lowering the temperature, typically by 5-15 degrees F, before sunrise. Generally, the greater the magnitude of the temperature drop, the stronger it suppresses plant height.

  • Cold-intermediate bedding plants

    Published on February 22, 2014
    Bedding plants that stop developing at moderately low temperatures can be labeled as cold-intermediate plants. This categorization is based on estimates of base temperatures derived from research data primarily generated at Michigan State University.

  • Cold-tolerant bedding plants

    Published on January 22, 2014
    Bedding plants that stop developing at low temperatures can be labeled as cold-tolerant plants. This categorization is based on estimates of base temperatures derived from research data primarily generated at Michigan State University.

  • Using +DIF to lower fuel costs

    Published on February 17, 2007
    As energy costs continue to be a concern, consider growing crops at a warm day temperature and a cool night temperature to help reduce fuel costs.

  • Wave petunia smart scheduling

    Published on March 22, 2013
    We quantified the effects of temperature and photosynthetic daily light integral on flowering time and characteristics of 15 Wave petunia cultivars, then generated temperature-based flowering time models for more predictable greenhouse scheduling.

  • Temperature effects on floriculture crops and energy consumption

    Published on November 15, 2006
    This article reviews the effects of temperature on production time of floriculture crops, especially annual bedding plants, and the impacts on greenhouse energy consumption for heating.

  • Manipulating day and night temperatures to control flowering and heating costs

    Published on February 22, 2013
    The difference between the day and night temperature influences plant height of many floriculture crops, as well as greenhouse energy consumption for heating.

  • Fanning uniformity in the greenhouse

    Published on May 17, 2008
    Horizontal airflow fans, which help create a more uniform greenhouse environment, can be a boon if used properly.

  • Energy-efficient annuals 4: Dianthus & snapdragon

    Published on June 22, 2009
    Researchers from Michigan State University present research-based information for scheduling dianthus and snapdragon in an energy-efficient and predictive manner. Part 4 of a 12-part series.

  • Energy-efficient annuals 10: Vinca & wax begonia

    Published on December 22, 2009
    Researchers from Michigan State University present research-based information for scheduling vinca and wax begonia in an energy-efficient and predictive manner. Part 10 of a 12-part series.

  • Plant temperature under greenhouse curtains

    Published on October 17, 2012
    Retractable energy curtains save energy costs by serving as an insulative layer and reducing the amount of space heated. In addition, plants under the curtains can be at least a few degrees warmer than plants not under a curtain.