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Showing results for content tagged 'height management of ornamentals'. Search instead for the keyword 'height management of ornamentals'.

  • Height Management of Ornamentals

    MSU Extension’s floriculture educational and applied research programs help improve greenhouse crop production and business management by providing trusted information on new production techniques and management strategies.


  • Plug / liner dip guidelines

    Published on February 18, 2013
    A plug or liner dip is a plant growth retardant (PGR) application technique for ornamentals in which a tray of finished young plants is placed into a shallow PGR solution for a short period of time.

  • Using ABA to reduce water loss

    Published on August 18, 2011
    Michigan State researchers investigated how an experimental formulation of abscisic acid (ABA) influenced drought stress tolerance of finished potted garden chrysanthemums and aster. The product mentioned is not commercially available.

  • Ethephon drenches on bedding plants

    Published on April 18, 2013
    In the second of a two-part series with ethephon (e.g., Florel), we shows that drenches are a viable method to control height and size of several bedding plant crops.

  • Maximizing PGR spray applications

    Published on April 18, 2010
    Despite the availability of many different plant growth regulators, their spraying methods are generally similar. How can you get the most out of each application?

  • A new height control possibility for daffodils and hyacinths

    Published on March 18, 2013
    In this first of a two-part series, we look at ethephon (e.g., Florel) release as affected by substrate pH, and results of drenches on daffodils and hyacinths.

  • PGR application considerations

    Published on May 18, 2013
    This article briefly presents some of the considerations when selecting which plant growth regulator (PGR) rate, method and active ingredient to apply to greenhouse-grown ornamental crops.

  • Using the PGRs Collate and Florel

    Published on June 18, 2013
    Achieving consistent results with the plant growth regulators (PGRs) Collate or Florel can be trickier than with other PGRs simply because the active ingredient, ethylene, is a gas.

  • Graphical tracking

    Published on July 18, 2007
    Graphical tracking, a decision-support tool, can help growers monitor plant height throughout production and identify when plants are too tall or too short.

  • Trending: PGR sprenches

    Published on April 17, 2015
    A sprench of a plant growth regulator (PGR) is a hybrid of a spray and a drench application, and is increasingly being used in the production of greenhouse ornamentals.

  • Comparing PGRs

    Published on October 18, 2008
    Plant growth retardants (PGRs) are often used by commercial growers to produce a more compact, higher quality ornamental plant. This article compares the efficacy of different products with the same active ingredient.

  • Choosing growth regulators doesn't need to be a chore

    Published on October 18, 2007
    More growth regulators with the same active ingredient are available. Read these five considerations to help choose which one will best meet your needs.

  • Going beyond the surface

    Published on September 18, 2009
    In some cases, adding a surfactant to a plant growth regulator solution can improve the product’s efficacy and increase uptake. How can you know when to use these products?

  • Know your application techniques

    Published on August 18, 2006
    Be sure to select the proper plant growth regulator application technique to achieve your desired crop size.

  • Sumagic on bedding plants

    Published on April 18, 2005
    Usage of this highly active plant growth regulator (active ingredient: uniconazole) on bedding plants is for the experienced commercial grower. Read how to use it, when it’s best used, and how much is recommended based on this MSU research.

  • A new paclobutrazol (Piccolo 10XC)

    Published on September 18, 2011
    Fine Americas released a new, more concentrated formulation of paclobutrazol called Piccolo10XC. Plant responses were similar when the same active ingredient, volume, and application rate were used.

  • PGR dilution guide

    Published on April 18, 2013
    A critical factor for effective use of plant growth regulators (PGRs) is that the solution is mixed in the appropriate concentration.

  • Environment and PGR interactions

    Published on December 17, 2015
    When plant growth regulators (PGRs) are applied as sprays, their efficacy can be greatly influenced by the environment. Understanding how environmental factors influence PGR spray efficacy can lead to more effective and predictable plant responses.

  • Spray vs. sprench vs. drench

    Published on July 18, 2010
    This article discusses three application methods for plant growth regulators: foliar spray, substrate drench, and sprench, which is a hybrid between a spray and a drench. Here are some guidelines to help you determine which method is most appropriate.

  • Managing perennial stock plants with Florel

    Published on August 18, 2004
    Michigan State research determines whether Florel (active ingredient: ethephon) can be used as a tool to keep perennial stock plants vegetative and increase the number of cuttings harvested for six species of herbaceous perennials.

  • Control stem length with liner dips

    Published on November 18, 2011
    Dipping trays of rooted liners and plugs into a PGR solution, or liner dip, is a newer method of efficiently applying root-absorbed PGRs that controls stem elongation after transplanting.