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Floriculture & Greenhouse Crop Production

Nursery & Christmas Trees

Department of Community Sustainability

Vegetables

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  • Light spectrum for different applications

    Published on September 8, 2021
    This article discusses the effects of the light spectrum on plants, and conceptually how it can be used for different greenhouse and indoor crop production applications.

  • Far red is the new red

    Published on February 6, 2017
    Adding far red to red and blue light from LEDs brings control of plant growth to the next level.

  • Effects of blue light on plants

    Published on February 2, 2017
    Blue light is usually referred to as radiation with wavelengths between 400 and 500 nanometers. This waveband is within the visible spectrum, has relatively high energy, and has pronounced effects on plant growth and flowering.

  • The importance of light uniformity

    Published on March 3, 2017
    Managing light is obviously critical to the production of crops grown in controlled environments. When considering the different dimensions of light, we often overlook the importance of light uniformity.

  • Maximizing photosynthesis, minimizing respiration

    Published on March 8, 2021
    Conceptually, anything growers can do to increase photosynthesis and decrease respiration can increase growth, leading to thicker stems, faster rooting, more branches, and more and larger flowers and fruits

  • Ethylene in floriculture

    Published on January 7, 2019
    Ethylene can be a harmful contaminant in greenhouses and during shipping, but there are also situations when ethylene can elicit desirable responses in greenhouse crop production.

  • Differentiating broad spectra

    Published on September 6, 2021
    In part 2 of a 5-part series on the production of leafy greens indoors, this article discusses how substituting white light (broad spectra) with red and/or blue light influences lettuce production.

  • Making sense of light sensors

    Published on February 10, 2021
    In this article, we discuss light sensors, light units, and how to convert light units from a greenhouse environmental control computer into more meaningful values.

  • Lighting the way with LEDs

    Published on July 10, 2012
    Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are one of the trendiest technologies in the greenhouse industry. There are particularly interesting opportunities with LEDs in the production of young plants and highwire vegetable crops.

  • LEDs in floriculture

    Published on June 24, 2009
    LED technology, first used in the mid-1980s, has come a long way and may make its way into the greenhouse in coming years.

  • How much supplemental lighting do you need?

    Published on December 17, 2019
    Several factors need to be considered when choosing a supplemental lighting system, and arguably the most important one is to determine what light intensity you want to deliver. This article provides steps on how to do that.

  • Controlling height with temperature drops

    Published on April 17, 2009
    Temperature drop is the practice of lowering the temperature, typically by 5-15 degrees F, before sunrise. Generally, the greater the magnitude of the temperature drop, the stronger it suppresses plant height.

  • Increasing the daily light integral

    Published on August 6, 2021
    The daily light integral (DLI) refers to the cumulative amount of light received per day, which influences the quality and yield of horticultural crops. This article discusses ways to increase the DLI for plants grown in greenhouses.

  • Chemical Weed Control Strategies for Nurseries and Landscapes: Part II

    Published on December 1, 2019
    Chemical weed control by application of preemergent (PRE) and postemergent (POST) herbicides is the most effective and economic method to control weeds in landscape planting beds and in container nursery production systems.

  • Non-chemical Weed Control Strategies for Nurseries and Landscapes: Part I

    Published on December 1, 2019
    According to the Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development, Michigan has the fourth largest nursery industry in the nation.

  • Problems with footcandles, lux and lumens

    Published on September 23, 2013
    The horticultural industry should discontinue use of photometric units such as lumens, lux and foot-candles. These units are based on people’s perception of light and are a highly misleading indicator of plant growth and flowering applications.

  • Height control for vegetable transplants

    Published on February 18, 2010
    A supplemental labeling of Sumagic for use on vegetable transplants in the U.S. has made height control less complicated. There are a few other methods that may be helpful, too.

  • Which light sensor should I use?

    Published on September 23, 2012
    This article focuses on the different units of instantaneous light intensity and how each is measured.

  • Environment and PGR interactions

    Published on December 17, 2015
    When plant growth regulators (PGRs) are applied as sprays, their efficacy can be greatly influenced by the environment. Understanding how environmental factors influence PGR spray efficacy can lead to more effective and predictable plant responses.

  • Increasing height of chrysanthemum with PGR drenches

    Published on July 10, 2017
    Results are presented for an experiment in which we compared the efficacy of spray versus drench applications of a plant growth regulator (PGR) at increasing plant height of potted chrysanthemum plants.