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Floriculture & Greenhouse Crop Production

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  • Controlling height with temperature drops

    Published on April 17, 2009
    Temperature drop is the practice of lowering the temperature, typically by 5-15 degrees F, before sunrise. Generally, the greater the magnitude of the temperature drop, the stronger it suppresses plant height.

  • Brushing plants for height control

    Published on February 18, 2009
    “Brushing” plants is proving to be a promising, albeit unconventional, height control technique. When touched or moved, plants release ethylene, which can inhibit elongation.

  • The ABCs of PGRs

    Published on November 18, 2008
    There are now a large number of plant growth regulators registered for use on ornamental plants. This article discusses the various active ingredients and the product names for each.

  • Getting results with liner dip

    Published on November 18, 2008
    In this article, we provide four keys to successful use of using plant growth regulators as liner (or plug) dips.

  • Comparing PGRs

    Published on October 18, 2008
    Plant growth retardants (PGRs) are often used by commercial growers to produce a more compact, higher quality ornamental plant. This article compares the efficacy of different products with the same active ingredient.

  • Improving branching and postharvest quality

    Published on August 18, 2008
    When used properly, benzyladenine (BA) sprays have commercial potential, and can increase the number of tertiary shoots in poinsettia and delay lower-leaf yellowing (chlorosis).

  • PGRs on perennials

    Published on June 18, 2008
    Learn how to choose the right plant growth regulator (PGR) and application method for commercial production of herbaceous perennial crops.

  • Increasing poinsettia size

    Published on October 18, 2007
    Are your potted poinsettias vertically challenged? When applied on young stems before the first hint of color, chemicals can help promote stem extension and take your plants to new heights.

  • Choosing growth regulators doesn't need to be a chore

    Published on October 18, 2007
    More growth regulators with the same active ingredient are available. Read these five considerations to help choose which one will best meet your needs.

  • Graphical tracking

    Published on July 18, 2007
    Graphical tracking, a decision-support tool, can help growers monitor plant height throughout production and identify when plants are too tall or too short.

  • PGR drench guidelines

    Published on April 18, 2007
    A drench of a plant growth regulator (PGR) is an application of a relatively large volume of solution at a low concentration to the growing media. Learn more about which chemicals are appropriate for drenches, as well as suggested volumes and rates.

  • Know your application techniques

    Published on August 18, 2006
    Be sure to select the proper plant growth regulator application technique to achieve your desired crop size.

  • Non-chemical height control strategies for greenhouse crops: part II

    Published on April 28, 2006
    In this issue, we focus on a few cultural strategies that can be used to control plant height.

  • Non-chemical height control strategies for greenhouse crops

    Published on April 14, 2006
    Covering the advantages and disadvantages of plant growth retardants (PGRs).

  • Fascination on poinsettia

    Published on September 12, 2005
    Did you hit your poinsettias with too much growth retardant? This Michigan State University research shows how to recover using products that contain gibberellic acid.

  • Sumagic on bedding plants

    Published on April 18, 2005
    Usage of this highly active plant growth regulator (active ingredient: uniconazole) on bedding plants is for the experienced commercial grower. Read how to use it, when it’s best used, and how much is recommended based on this MSU research.

  • Managing perennial stock plants with Florel

    Published on August 18, 2004
    Michigan State research determines whether Florel (active ingredient: ethephon) can be used as a tool to keep perennial stock plants vegetative and increase the number of cuttings harvested for six species of herbaceous perennials.

  • Florel on summer production of pansy

    Published on April 18, 2004
    We performed experiments to determine if ethephon (e.g., Florel) could be used to delay flowering of pansy and viola when grown under bright, warm and long-day conditions.

  • PGR rates and timing for plug production

    Published on November 18, 2003
    Application rates and timing of the plant growth regulator Bonzi (active ingredient: paclobutrazol) was put to the test in this Michigan State University research on seedling plugs of bedding plants.