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  • Cover crops for dairy farms

    Published on June 27, 2012
    Cover crops can be a great option for dairy farmers looking to add nitrogen to the soil, reduce weed pressure, build soil organic matter and suppress nematodes.

  • “Common Sense” for dairy farmers

    Published on December 19, 2017
    Words of encouragement and challenge from the American Revolution hold value today for dairy farmers facing a crisis of their own.

  • Cover Crops Options for Prevented Planting

    Published on June 5, 2019
    Podcast recording on cover crop options for prevented planting.

  • MSU Dairy Virtual Coffee Break: Environmental considerations for winter

    Published on November 20, 2020
    Environmental educators Sarah Fronczak and Erica Rogers discuss what considerations farms need to be aware of as they enter the winter. They cover winter spreading, equipment, silage leach, among other important topics for this time of the year.

  • Mixed forage plantings create ration balancing challenges for dairy producers

    Published on June 19, 2013
    Planting mixed forages can have significant variation across the field. Variation of feedstuffs causes problems in dairy ration balancing.

  • Cover Crops for Urban Farms

    Published on January 9, 2020

    MSU Extension Educator, Abby Harper, shares information on integrating cover crops into urban farms and gardens. Urban soils can be heavily degraded when top-soil is removed for construction. Sites that previously hosted buildings also have heavily compacted soils. Compacted soil makes it difficult for crop roots to penetrate and access water and nutrients, and also limit water penetration and cause flooding or standing water Cover crops can also help address non soil-specific problems, such as creating forage for pollinators, reducing weed pressure, and preventing soil and nutrients from running off into waterways.

  • Dairy farmers looking for forages to replace alfalfa

    Published on June 28, 2013
    Many dairy farms across the Midwest are short of alfalfa. Finding an acceptable alternative forage will be a critical factor contributing to the success of dairy operations this next year.

  • Seeding Equipment for Cover Crops

    Published on January 9, 2020

    MSU Extension Educator, Paul Gross

  • Sorghum for Cover Crops and Forage

    Published on January 9, 2020

    Michigan State University (MSU) Forage and Cover Crop Specialist, Kim Cassida, explores how dual-purpose use for Sorghum cover crops can benefit both soil health and livestock. Forage sorghum, sudangrass, and sorghum-sudangrass hybrids (sometimes abbreviated as sudex) are exceptionally heat and drought tolerant annual crops that are often used as cover crops. They also have a long history as livestock feed harvested as hay, haylage, or pasture. This makes them a prime candidate for dual purpose use as both cover crop and forage. Dual purpose cover crops can help crop growers recoup the cost of planting a cover, while providing much needed feed for livestock. Because roots are not harvested, many of the soil improvement benefits remain. Frost-killed pasture can be stockpiled for winter grazing similar to corn stover, while also continuing to provide ground cover and erosion protection.

  • New Crops for New Customers Webinar

    Published on February 11, 2016

    Getting started with new crops for new customers webinar.

  • Dairy Center Heralded for Producing Some of the Nation's Best Milk

    Published on July 9, 2013
    The MSU Dairy Cattle Teaching and Research Center produces some pretty good milk. Actually, it's great milk. In fact, it's some of the best milk in the United States.

  • MSU Feedlot Educational Series: Tips for Raising Dairy Beef Calves

    Published on February 1, 2021

    In session two of the MSU Feedlot Educational Series, Marianne Buza offers some tips for raising dairy beef calves. First, Marianne discusses the importance of colostrum consumption by the calf, colostrum use on Michigan diary farms, and how you can measure to check if the calf has received adequate colostrum. Sanitation practices were discussed to help ensure the prevention of disease between calves. Additionally, when to consider euthanasia was discussed, as well as using necropsy as an investigative means to combat future morbidity and mortality outbreaks.

  • mast crops for wildlife

    2019 DNR wildlife bureau presentation on mast crops for wildlife

  • Cover Crops Virtual Field Day - Kellogg Biological Station

    Published on September 1, 2020

    The W.K. Kellogg Farm provides agronomic support for the Pasture Dairy Center, the Michigan Cover Crops Program at KBS, the LTER program, GLBRC sustainability research and general crops research. The farm oversees all managed crop and pasture lands at KBS, and provides research access and logistical support for all agricultural research at KBS.

  • Field Crops Virtual Breakfast: Managing Corn Silage for Quality

    Published on September 3, 2020

    The MSU Extension Field Crops Virtual Breakfast weekly discussion for September 3, 2020, focuses on managing corn silage for quality, presented by Manni Singh, MSU cropping systems agronomist. Following Singh’s presentation, Claire White at Michigan Corn gives an update on corn yield.

  • Field Crops Virtual Breakfast: Managing Corn Silage for Quality

    Published on September 3, 2020

    The MSU Extension Field Crops Virtual Breakfast weekly discussion for September 3, 2020, focuses on managing corn silage for quality, presented by Manni Singh, MSU cropping systems agronomist. Following Singh’s presentation, Claire White at Michigan Corn gives an update on corn yield.

  • Cover Crops Virtual Field Day - D'Arcy Farms

    Published on September 1, 2020

    Rich & Beverly D’Arcy farm 2,000 acres near Kingston, in Sanilac County. The crops they raise are corn, soybeans, navy beans, and wheat. D’Arcy’s have been no-till for 25-30 years and have been working with cover crops for the last 7-10 years and believe they are a great companion program to no-till. They have been able to reduce costs in field work to cover the cost of cover crop seed. In a typical year, they will follow wheat with ~10,000 gallons of dairy liquid manure from local farms followed by a cover crop as soon as possible. The crop mix includes combinations of winter rye, clovers, oats, turnips, and rape seed.

  • Time management for dairy cows

    Published on February 27, 2011
    Minimize disruptions to cows’ time budget by avoiding overstocking, providing comfortable freestalls and preventing prolonged times for milking and in lock-ups. Keeping cows within their desired time budget ensures good cow welfare, health and performance.

  • Extending holding time for crops

    Published on April 7, 2008
    extending holding time for crops