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  • Tomato spotted wilt virus symptoms in chrysanthemum

    Published on August 11, 2016
    Symptoms of tomato spotted wilt virus on chrysanthemum are yellow blotching and rings, necrotic lesions and stem collapse.

  • Tomato brown rugose fruit virus (ToBRFV): A new concern for tomato and pepper producers

    Published on November 25, 2019
    Tomato brown rugose fruit virus (ToBRFV) is making headlines and eliciting USDA action. Growers need to learn more about ToBRFV biology, symptoms and control.

  • Fall garden mums are susceptible to tomato spotted wilt virus

    Published on September 1, 2011
    Tomato spotted wilt virus was recently found in greenhouse-grown fall mums. There is no curative chemical treatment once infected, so good management of thrips and proper sanitation practices are imperative for controlling this virus.

  • Tomato spotted wilt virus found in fall garden mums

    Published on August 27, 2013
    Fall garden mums are susceptible to tomato spotted wilt virus. There is no curative chemical treatment once infected, so good management of thrips and proper sanitation practices are imperative for control.

  • Growers of fall garden mums need to inspect and test for tomato spotted wilt virus now

    Published on June 26, 2014
    By inspecting and testing fall garden mums now, growers can avoid problems later this summer and fall. Recognize tomato spotted wilt virus symptoms and thrips control strategies.

  • Tobacco Mosaic Virus 2006

    Published on May 10, 2006

  • Tomato/Tobacco ringspot decline

    These diseases occur sporadically in vinifera grapes and interspecific hybrids. Labrusca grapes are resistant. In the first year of infection, a few leaves may show mottling. The second year, new growth is generally sparse because infected buds are prone to winterkill. Infected vines show shortened internodes with small, distorted leaves and sparse fruit clusters with uneven ripening. The third year, growth is very stunted and limited to basal suckers, and the vine eventually dies. Dead and dying vines are usually present in a roughly circular pattern in the vineyard. The viruses are introduced into vineyards with infected planting stock or by dispersal of seed from infected weeds. The virus is then spread by dagger nematodes feeding on roots of infected plants. The nematodes can retain the virus for long periods. Both viruses infect common weeds such as dandelion, sheep sorrel, common chickweed and red clover. Tomato ringspot virus also infects many fruit crops. These viruses may already be present in land used to establish new vineyards. The viruses are introduced into vineyards with infected planting stock or by dispersal of seed from infected weeds. The virus is then spread by dagger nematodes feeding on roots of infected plants. The nematodes can retain the virus for long periods. Both viruses infect common weeds such as dandelion, sheep sorrel, common chickweed and red clover. Tomato ringspot virus also infects many fruit crops. These viruses may already be present in land used to establish new vineyards.

  • Tomato spotted wilt can be a northern vegetable problem

    Published on October 16, 2012
    Tomato spotted wilt virus is a devastating disease affecting numerous crop and non-crop species, but is typically not a problem of northern states. So why does it appear in some northern vegetable plantings?

  • Tobacco mosaic virus on greenhouse crops

    Published on February 11, 2010

  • Apple mosaic virus

    Young leaves develop pale to bright cream-colored spots, blotches, bandings or patterns as they expand in the spring. These turn brown and become necrotic as they age and premature defoliation may occur when infection is severe.

  • Plum pox virus

    There is considerable variation in symptoms, depending on which species of stone fruit is affected, variety, age, and general nutritional status of the tree. On leaves, symptoms may include vein yellowing, banding, or the formation of light green to yellow rings.

  • Assistance in raspberry virus diagnosis offered

    Published on June 2, 2015
    Free diagnostic survey available for Michigan raspberry growers to determine cause of crumbly fruit and other production problems.

  • Prunus stem pitting

    Affected trees appear weak and show a general decline. Leaves may have upward cupping, turning prematurely yellow or reddish purple, droop, and then prematurely drop. The bark is abnormally thick and spongy and the wood underneath has a severely pitted, indented texture. Symptoms are most severe in the wood just above and below the soil line.

  • Apple union necrosis and decline

    AUND is due to an incompatibility at the graft union where a resistant scion is grafted onto a susceptible, but tolerant rootstock, most commonly MM.106.

  • Constriction disease of Stanley plum (Brown line)

    Brown line disease is due to an incompatibility at the graft union when Stanley plum and some other European or hybrid plum varieties are grafted onto Myrobalan rootstock. Asian plums are not affected. Infected trees show a general decline and bear small, pale green leaves.

  • Raspberry virus survey to help diagnose production problems

    Published on September 30, 2016
    Growers who have seen symptoms such as crumbly fruit, low vigor or leaf yellowing are invited to participate in virus survey until Oct. 21, 2016.

  • Grape virus diagnostic support during the 2012 growing season

    Published on May 15, 2012
    Free diagnosis of grapevine viruses proved by Michigan State University.

  • Green ring mottle virus

    The virus produces symptoms on sour cherry, primarily the variety Montmorency. Apricot, peach, and sweet cherry are symptomless hosts. Yellow mottling with irregularly shaped green islands or rings appear on the leaves of infected trees.

  • Free grape virus diagnostic support this fall

    Published on September 21, 2011
    Have a suspicion your vineyard may have a virus disease? Send in your infected leaf samples to MSU for a free tentative diagnosis.

  • Developing a virus reduction strategy for cucurbits

    Published on February 26, 2013
    Most vegetable crops are susceptible to virus diseases, especially cucurbit crops. Understanding the virus cycle and planning can reduce economic loss.