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  • Non-Chemical Height Control

    Published on November 18, 2010

  • Increasing plant height

    Published on October 17, 2014
    There are numerous ways to promote extension growth, including changes to plant culture or the growing environment, or applying a plant growth regulator that includes gibberellic acid.

  • Increasing poinsettia size

    Published on October 18, 2007
    Are your potted poinsettias vertically challenged? When applied on young stems before the first hint of color, chemicals can help promote stem extension and take your plants to new heights.

  • Increasing height of chrysanthemum with PGR drenches

    Published on July 10, 2017
    Results are presented for an experiment in which we compared the efficacy of spray versus drench applications of a plant growth regulator (PGR) at increasing plant height of potted chrysanthemum plants.

  • Sumagic on bedding plants

    Published on April 18, 2005
    Usage of this highly active plant growth regulator (active ingredient: uniconazole) on bedding plants is for the experienced commercial grower. Read how to use it, when it’s best used, and how much is recommended based on this MSU research.

  • Using a GA to increase plant height

    Published on August 8, 2018
    Regardless of the cause, the most common technique to increase plant height of containerized flowering plants is an application of gibberellic acid by someone certified as a pesticide applicator.

  • Graphical tracking

    Published on July 18, 2007
    Graphical tracking, a decision-support tool, can help growers monitor plant height throughout production and identify when plants are too tall or too short.

  • Using chlormequat chloride with success

    Published on April 18, 2014
    Chlormequat chloride is a plant growth retardant used to promote flowering or inhibit extension growth of floriculture crops grown in greenhouses, shadehouses and container nurseries.

  • PGRs on perennials

    Published on June 18, 2008
    Learn how to choose the right plant growth regulator (PGR) and application method for commercial production of herbaceous perennial crops.

  • Ethylene in floriculture

    Published on January 7, 2019
    Ethylene can be a harmful contaminant in greenhouses and during shipping, but there are also situations when ethylene can elicit desirable responses in greenhouse crop production.

  • Rice hulls and PGRs - en Español

    Published on December 23, 2010

  • Trending: PGR sprenches

    Published on April 17, 2015
    A sprench of a plant growth regulator (PGR) is a hybrid of a spray and a drench application, and is increasingly being used in the production of greenhouse ornamentals.

  • PGR rates and timing for plug production

    Published on November 18, 2003
    Application rates and timing of the plant growth regulator Bonzi (active ingredient: paclobutrazol) was put to the test in this Michigan State University research on seedling plugs of bedding plants.

  • PGR application considerations

    Published on May 18, 2013
    This article briefly presents some of the considerations when selecting which plant growth regulator (PGR) rate, method and active ingredient to apply to greenhouse-grown ornamental crops.

  • Spray vs. sprench vs. drench

    Published on July 18, 2010
    This article discusses three application methods for plant growth regulators: foliar spray, substrate drench, and sprench, which is a hybrid between a spray and a drench. Here are some guidelines to help you determine which method is most appropriate.

  • Maximizing PGR spray applications

    Published on April 18, 2010
    Despite the availability of many different plant growth regulators, their spraying methods are generally similar. How can you get the most out of each application?

  • Going beyond the surface

    Published on September 18, 2009
    In some cases, adding a surfactant to a plant growth regulator solution can improve the product’s efficacy and increase uptake. How can you know when to use these products?

  • Do it yourself (conduct your own trials)

    Published on May 18, 2010
    Many articles often recommend that growers perform their own smal-scale tests for the specified procedures. Here are a few tips for conducting your own experiments.

  • A new paclobutrazol (Piccolo 10XC)

    Published on September 18, 2011
    Fine Americas released a new, more concentrated formulation of paclobutrazol called Piccolo10XC. Plant responses were similar when the same active ingredient, volume, and application rate were used.

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