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Showing results for content tagged 'height management of ornamentals'. Search instead for the keyword 'height management of ornamentals'.

  • Height Management of Ornamentals

    MSU Extension’s floriculture educational and applied research programs help improve greenhouse crop production and business management by providing trusted information on new production techniques and management strategies.


  • Managing crop height

    Published on February 3, 2021

    Professor Emeritus Royal Heins discusses the history of DIF, which is the temperature difference between the day and night, and how it can be used to manage plant height of floriculture crops produced in greenhouses. He also discusses graphical tracking of the height of potted flowering plants to help growers achieve their desired height targets.

  • Jeremy Jubenville

    Floriculture Educator
    jubenvi3@msu.edu
    269-384-8010

  • Heidi Lindberg

    West Michigan Greenhouse and Nursery Education & Research
    wollaege@msu.edu
    616-994-4701

  • Roberto Lopez

    Associate Professor
    rglopez@msu.edu
    517-353-0342

  • Erik Runkle

    Professor
    runkleer@msu.edu
    (517) 353-0350

  • Success with PGRs

    Published on March 18, 2019
    Regardless of the desired outcome, successful use of a plant growth regulator (PGR) requires multiple considerations and attention to detail. This article summarizes practices to obtain the best results from your PGR applications.

  • A new height control possibility for daffodils and hyacinths

    Published on March 18, 2013
    In this first of a two-part series, we look at ethephon (e.g., Florel) release as affected by substrate pH, and results of drenches on daffodils and hyacinths.

  • Tips on using uniconazole

    Published on April 18, 2011
    This article provides suggestions for how and when to use uniconazole (e.g., Sumagic and Concise) as a spray or drench to obtain desirable, more compact ornamental plants.

  • Effective use of PGRs

    Published on July 18, 2014
    Plant growth regulators (PGRs) are sometimes not used to their potential; they are sometimes applied too late or at an inappropriate rate. Here are some important considerations for getting the most out of your PGRs.

  • Using ABA to reduce water loss

    Published on August 18, 2011
    Michigan State researchers investigated how an experimental formulation of abscisic acid (ABA) influenced drought stress tolerance of finished potted garden chrysanthemums and aster. The product mentioned is not commercially available.

  • The PGR ancymidol

    Published on February 17, 2015
    Plant growth retardants (PGRs) that contain the active ingredient ancymidol aren’t as commonly used in floriculture as most other PGRs, but there are some potential upsides that merit consideration.

  • PGR rates and timing for plug production

    Published on November 18, 2003
    Application rates and timing of the plant growth regulator Bonzi (active ingredient: paclobutrazol) was put to the test in this Michigan State University research on seedling plugs of bedding plants.

  • Increasing poinsettia size

    Published on October 18, 2007
    Are your potted poinsettias vertically challenged? When applied on young stems before the first hint of color, chemicals can help promote stem extension and take your plants to new heights.

  • PGR drench guidelines

    Published on April 18, 2007
    A drench of a plant growth regulator (PGR) is an application of a relatively large volume of solution at a low concentration to the growing media. Learn more about which chemicals are appropriate for drenches, as well as suggested volumes and rates.

  • Do it yourself (conduct your own trials)

    Published on May 18, 2010
    Many articles often recommend that growers perform their own smal-scale tests for the specified procedures. Here are a few tips for conducting your own experiments.

  • Increasing plant height

    Published on October 17, 2014
    There are numerous ways to promote extension growth, including changes to plant culture or the growing environment, or applying a plant growth regulator that includes gibberellic acid.

  • Successful use of paclobutrazol

    Published on April 18, 2012
    Paclobutrazol is probably the most widely used plant growth retardant in the production of floriculture crops because of its wide range of efficacy and moderate- to long-lasting response.

  • Ethephon drenches on bedding plants

    Published on April 18, 2013
    In the second of a two-part series with ethephon (e.g., Florel), we shows that drenches are a viable method to control height and size of several bedding plant crops.

  • How to avoid GA carryover

    Published on August 18, 2010
    Gibberellins (GA) can bind to plastic and concrete, and potentially cause excessive growth, especially in sensitive crops.

  • Choosing growth regulators doesn't need to be a chore

    Published on October 18, 2007
    More growth regulators with the same active ingredient are available. Read these five considerations to help choose which one will best meet your needs.