2019 Fruit insecticide registration update

Summary of insecticide and miticide label additions, clarifications and corrections to the 2019 Michigan Fruit Management Guide (E0154).

Editor's note: This article was updated April 26, 2019, to include the addition of Magister.

The following is a review of insecticide and miticide label changes and restrictions to the Michigan State University Extension Bulletin E0154, “2019 Michigan Fruit Management Guide.” Agri-chemical labels and regulations can change quickly, so use this information within the context of each compound's legal label.

Insecticide 2019 label additions, clarifications and corrections

Compound

Label changes/restrictions

Crop

Target pests

Apta

New registration

Apples, pears, blueberries, caneberries

Plum curcullio, leafrollers, thrips, spotted wing Drosophila, fruitworm, gall midge

Verdepryn

Registration expected in 2019

Pome and stone fruits, blueberries, caneberries

Internal feeders, leafrollers, spotted wing Drosophila, fruitworms, aphids

Intrepid Edge

New registration

Grapes

Grape berry moth, leafrollers

Versys

New registration

Pome and stone fruits

Aphids

Spear-Lep

New registration

Pome and stone fruits, berries

Leafrollers

Magister 1.6SC

Label expansion

Pome and stone fruits, blueberries, grapes, cranberries

Mites

New insecticide label information for compounds listed in 2019 E0154

MSU Fruit Management Guide E0154 product numbers are in parenthesis ().

Apta (3) (tolfenpyrad) belongs to the Mitochondrial Complex I Electron Transport Inhibitors (METI 1), which work by inhibiting cellular respiration in the mitochondria. Apta is registered in pome fruits, stone fruits, blueberries and caneberries for control of a range of pests including fruitworms, leafrollers, aphids, thrips, leafhoppers, plum curculio, eriophyid mites, Rhagoletis and Drosophila fruit flies (suppression of spotted wing Drosophila). The maximum yearly amount of Apta 15 SC that can be applied is 53.5 ounces in pome fruits, 54 fluid ounces in stone fruits, 81 ounces in blueberries and 54 ounces in caneberries.

Verdepryn (22) (cyclaniliprole, Cyclapryn) belongs to the diamide class of insecticides, which work on the insect by activating ryanodine receptors, thus preventing muscle contraction. Verdepryn 100SL is expecting U.S. EPA registration in 2019 for pome fruits, stone fruits, blueberries and caneberries for control of a range of pests including leafrollers, codling moth, oriental fruit moth, plum curculio, aphids, pear psylla, Japanese beetles, Rhagoletis fruit flies, spotted wing Drosophila and fruitworms. Cyclapryn has shown to be relatively safe on most beneficials.

Intrepid Edge (29) (methoxyfenozide + spinetoram) is an insecticide that combines two active ingredients as a pre-mix formulated compound. It registered for use on grapes for the control of lepidopteran insect pests such as the grape berry moth and leafrollers.  The maximum yearly amount of Intrepid Edge that can be applied is 38.25 fluid ounces in grapes. Note that the pre-harvest interval for this product ranges from 21 to 30 days, depending on the rate applied.

Versys 0.83DC (31) (Afidopyropen) is a chordotonal organ TRPV (Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid) channel modulator, registered in pome and stone fruits for control of a range of aphids, including rosy apple aphids, green aphids, black cherry aphids and woolly apple aphids. Versys works by disrupting feeding and other behaviors in the target insects. The maximum yearly amount of Versys DC that can be applied is 7 fluid ounces (0.045 pound afidopyropen active ingredient) in pome fruits and 3 fluid ounces in stone fruits.

New insecticide label information for compounds not listed in 2019 E0154

Spear-Lep (GS-omega/kappa-Hxtx-Hv1a) is a peptide-based Biopesticide labelled for pome and stone fruits, blueberries, caneberries, strawberries and grapes for control of a range of leafrollers, aphids, fruitworms and tussock moth. Spear functions as a central nervous system inhibitor, and performance is enhanced when tank-mixed with Bacillus Thuringiensis (Bts). Spear-Lep has a zero-day pre-harvest interval and is relatively non-toxic to mammals, birds, fish, honeybees and other beneficial insects.

Magister (16) (fenazaquin) is a GCIS miticide METI (Mitochondrial Electron Transport Inhibitor) class that is registered for spider mite, European red mite and rust mite control in pome and stone fruits, blueberries, grapes and caneberries. Magister is active on mites as a larvo-adulticide by contact and ingestion, also with activity on summer eggs of Panonychus. Magister provides up to 3-5 weeks of residual control, and is harmless on most beneficials, but having moderate toxicity on honey bees and phytoseiid predacious mites. Magister is limited to a single application per year.

Drs. Wise, Isaacs and Gut’s work is funded in part by MSU AgBioResearch.


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