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SNAP-Ed Youth Nutrition Education 2017-2018

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December 21, 2018 - Author:

The Big Picture

28,992 youth reached through a series and 23,995 youth reached through single session presentations

MSU Extension Action

MSU Extension partners with Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (MDHHS) to provide Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Education (SNAP-Ed), a free nutrition education program to reduce hunger and food insecurity and promote healthy eating habits. The goal of SNAP-Ed is to improve the likelihood that persons eligible for SNAP will make healthy food and lifestyle choices within a limited budget and choose physically active lifestyles consistent with the current DGA and the USDA food guidance.

The Impact

Youth K-2nd Grade

Teachers (n=1,067) observed the following behavior change with their students after a nutrition education series:

  • 94% more aware of the importance of good nutrition
  • 83% identified foods groups correctly
  • 85% willing to try new foods
  • 84% improved hand washing
  • 63% increased physical activity
  • 74% eating more fruits
  • 67% eating more vegetables

The teachers also reported the following after the series:

  • 53% reported they were more willing to try new foods
  • 49% reported being more aware of the importance of good nutrition

Youth 3rd-5th Grade

Youth (n=4,904) reported the following significant increase in frequency after a series of nutrition education:

  • 3.53 times more likely to eat fruit
  • 3.57 times more likely to eat breakfast
  •  2.65 times more likely to be physical activity
  • 2.83 times more likely to ask their family to have cut-up vegetables in the refrigerator where they could reach them.
  • 4.34 times more likely to eat vegetables after the nutrition education series

Youth 3rd-5th Grade

Youth (n=1,919) reported the following significant frequencies after a series of nutrition education:

  • 2.21 times less likely to drink sugar sweetened beverages
  • 2.27 times less likely to spend time watching TV or movies, playing electronic games, or using a computer for something that is not schoolwork

Youth 6th-8th Grade

Youth 6-th-8th grade have a greater chance of nutrition practices after a nutrition education series:

  • 2.55 times more confident in following a recipe
  • 3.32 times more confident in using measuring cups and spoons
  • 2.91 times more likely to wash hands before eating
  • 1.71 times more likely to be physically active for at least one hour
  • 2.33 times more likely to eat whole grain products
  • 1.86 times more likely to eat fruit
  • 1.94 times more likely to eat vegetables

Youth 9th-12th Grade

Youth (n=667) reported the following significant frequencies after a series of nutrition education:

  • 2.29 times more likely to eat vegetables
  • 2.19 times more likely to eat fruit
  • 2.18 times more likely to drink non-fat or 1% low-fat milk
  • 2.41 times more likely to make healthy choices when eating at a restaurant or fast food place
  • 2.03 times more likely to be physical active for at least one hour
  • 2.37 times more likely to wash their hands before preparing something to eat

What Our Staff Are Saying

“In presenting a Grow It, Try It, Like It series to 3 year olds, I encountered a boy that refused to taste what he was given. The day care provider was not able to get him to eat any fruit or vegetable, with his standard reaction being to push it away. One day I got him to lick a slice of cantaloupe and the provider told me he ate cauliflower also! I asked how that happened, and she explained she had riced it and included it in a Mexican rice bowl like we had talked about....and the boy ate it right up!”

 

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SNAP-Ed

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