Closing the farm-to-table gap with Breakfast on the Farm

MSU Extension works to improve this disparity with programs like Breakfast on the Farm (BOTF) which provide an open door for the community to learn how its food is produced, and meet the local farmers who produce it.

Child petting Holstein cow at Breakfast on the Farm.

The number of farmers in the U.S. declines each year, representing less than 2 percent of the country’s population. This makes it difficult for farmers to personally interact with consumers, something that has become increasingly important when more than 70 percent of consumers admit to knowing very little about farming.

MSU Extension works to improve this disparity with programs like Breakfast on the Farm (BOTF). BOTF is an open door for the community to learn how its food is produced, and meet the local farmers who produce it.

Since its debut in 2009, BOTF has hosted 37 on-farm events, giving 83,486 visitors an opportunity to enjoy a free, farm-fresh breakfast and learn more about agriculture and daily life on a modern farm. Since 2012, exit surveys show that participants have an increased level of trust for local farms after their visit.

  • After visiting, 90% surveyed indicated they would talk to others about what they learned at BOTF.
  • Since 2012, BOTF exit surveys show that participants have an increased level of trust that farmers will keep milk safe for consumers, and care for animals and the environment.
  • About 20% of households increased dairy product purchases.

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