Michigan 4-H’ers pledge their hands to larger service in a time of need

Families and communities struggle to adapt to closed schools and businesses while working to maintain their own health and well-being. For many Michigan 4-H’ers, lending a hand is part of their normal, and have sprung into action to help their communities.

The Sebations, a 4-H family in St. Clair County, re-purposed a fair billboard thanking our essential workers. This is just one example of how Michigan 4-H’ers are lending their hands to larger service during this unprecedented time.
The Sebations, a 4-H family in St. Clair County, re-purposed a fair billboard thanking our essential workers. This is just one example of how Michigan 4-H’ers are lending their hands to larger service during this unprecedented time.

Across the state, county and globe, the novel coronavirus, the virus that causes the infectious disease COVID-19, has upended everyday life in nearly every way. In Michigan, families and communities struggle to adapt to closed schools and businesses while working to preserve their own health, well-being and sense of normalcy. For many Michigan 4-H’ers, lending a helping hand is part of that normal, and many have sprung into action to help their communities during this unprecedented time.

Across the state, 4-H’ers have many ways to serve their communities while practicing social distancing. Among them are:

• Kalkaska County 4-H member Amy Saxton issued a 4-H Dare to Serve Challenge for other 4-H’ers to join in her Cards for a Cause efforts, encouraging youth to send cards to individuals living in adult foster care homes not able to receive visitors at this time.

• Similarly, 4-H’ers in Lapeer and Schoolcraft counties are writing letters and cards of kindness to residents of local senior centers and nursing homes.

• Alger County 4-H’ers volunteered to shop for seniors who didn’t feel safe traveling to the store to purchase their groceries and other supplies.

• 4-H’ers in Delta, Eaton, Lake, Kalamazoo and Menominee counties have been sewing masks at home to donate to medical facilities in need.

• The Sebations, a 4-H family in St. Clair County, re-purposed a fair billboard thanking our essential workers.

“I continue to be impressed by the overwhelming generosity and creativity of our 4-H members, volunteers and staff across the state to continue the 4-H mission,” said Jacob DeDecker, Michigan 4-H state leader. “Our 4-H community remains committed to helping one another, while still practicing social distancing as directed by local, state and federal agencies.”

Youth aren’t the only ones stepping up in this time of need. Many 4-H program coordinators have come up with creative ways to continue 4-H programming and to promote 4-H.

• Charlevoix and Luce counties created 4-H project bags and activity handouts to include in sack lunches distributed by schools.

• Calhoun, Kalamazoo and Schoolcraft counties sent 4-H activity kits to Cloverbud members (youth aged 5 to 7) with age-appropriate activities such as Science on a Stick, a basil seed planting kit, Be a Nature Detective, Fun Fit Hike, instructions on making an origami clover and some clover coloring pages.

• Alger, Antrim, Crawford, Eaton, Kalkaska, Marquette and Schoolcraft County program coordinators have moved short-term special interest (SPIN) clubs online to engage youth virtually in a variety of topics.

 

With a sudden halt to many crowd-favorite, statewide face-to-face programs, Michigan State University (MSU) Extension staff members quickly converted and developed online content to serve the 4-H community. In addition, many new and exciting programs have been created to connect youth and families virtually with 4-H.

“In tough times, such as the uncertainty surrounding the current novel coronavirus pandemic, we recognize that accessing the vast knowledge and resources of MSU is more important than ever,” DeDecker said.

Online sessions offered have included a variety of topics including Family Yoga, Basics of Credit for Youth, Writing Wednesdays and an Animal Science Lunch and Learn Lecture series. Several counties have also developed county-wide online scavenger hunts. In addition, a Lenawee County 4-H volunteer and teacher is recording chicks hatching and sharing videos online to teach embryology.

MSU Extension has assembled a collection of digital offerings and educational materials in a new Remote Learning and Resources space. Part of this resource pool is a compilation of helpful educational resources for parents and caregivers. To learn more, visit https://www.canr.msu.edu/rlr.

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