The effects of stopping exercise: Part two

What effect does stopping exercising for the 10 percent of the population exercising regularly, which is defined as exercising for 30 minutes or more three times per week?

Busy schedules play a role in all we do throughout the day. It’s difficult with these schedules to routinely fit exercise in even when the benefits are well known. What effect does stopping exercising for the 10 percent of the population exercising regularly, which is defined as exercising for 30 minutes or more three times per week?

In part one of this topic, we discussed how cardiovascular health, emotion, memory, blood pressure and possibly effects the aging of the brain. These areas are important physiological systems but there are others as well.

How does stopping exercise effect blood glucose?

Stopping exercise for as little as 14 days showed (2015 study) a loss of blood glucose benefits experienced after having a continual eight month exercise routine of resistance and aerobic exercise showing improvements in blood glucose. Blood glucose is absorbed in muscles and tissues and is readily used more efficiently when exercise is part of a regular routine keeping these numbers at a level state instead of high levels in the blood. Having blood glucose at a consistent level in a person with diabetes is extremely important for reducing the possibility of experiencing a stroke or heart disease. Just thirty minutes of exercise a day (does not need to be completed at once) can keep blood glucose numbers under control.

Discontinuing a regular exercise routine affects blood glucose and muscle strength

Becoming injured, busy schedules, laziness or boredom can get in the way of a regular exercise routines making the benefits gained over time of regular exercise reduces overall strength. This reduction in strength can be in the heart muscles, body systems, or in the musculature, so ceasing exercise loses strength of the biceps and quadriceps muscles in as little as 10 – 28 days.

Loss of muscle tone and strength can also affect agility, speed, the ability to stop quickly, moving side to side, coordination, lowers metabolism, and balance. The older we are the quicker our muscle tone is lost from leading a sedentary lifestyle. On a positive note, strength losses are at a slower rate than endurance.

Stopping exercise affects blood glucose, muscle strength and decreases metabolic rate increasing body fat

When exercise is stopped the body does not need the amount of energy consumed as it did while on a regular routine. Metabolism slows with inactivity and muscle cells shrink while fat cells increase losing the once toned body changing the appearance of the body. Once having the flexibility of indulging in foods and seeing no fat gain are now beginning to show changes due to the decrease in metabolism.

Michigan State University Extension’s Health and Nutrition Institute has many programs to help individuals continue exercise programs. Experts from Michigan State University Extension make it possible to bring communities together and to educate citizens on a healthy lifestyle for a positive behavior change. 

Part One

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