Mark Wilson

Mark Wilson

wilsonmm@msu.edu

School of Planning, Design and Construction

Professor, Urban & Regional Planning

Telephone: 517-353-9056

Human Ecology Building
552 W. Circle Drive, Room 113
East Lansing, MI 48824

Area of Expertise:

Current Research: Autonomous vehicles; disruptive technologies; planning and impact of mega events (Olympics, World Cup, Expos etc); industrial park development

Methods: survey research; social media; content analysis

Additional interests: information technology; knowledge economy; nonprofit organizations


School of Planning, Design and Construction

Director, Planning, Design and Construction Doctorate Program


Degree:

Bachelors: Bachelor degree from the University of Melbourne.
Masters: Master's degree from the University of Melbourne and Master of arts in Regional Science from the University of Pennsylvania.
PhD: PhD in Regional Science from the University of Pennsylvania.


Wilson's Website.

Affiliated Programs/Initiatives/Projects:

Mark Wilson is a professor of Urban & Regional Planning in SPDC, with bachelor's and master’s degrees from the University of Melbourne (Australia), and an AM and PhD in Regional Science from the University of Pennsylvania. He is also the director of the Planning, Design and Construction doctorate program. His research and teaching interests address urban planning, information technology, economic geography, public policy and nonprofit organizations. Specific research interests focus on three themes: 1) The planning, land use and economic issues associated with mega events, such as the Olympics and World’s Fairs; 2) The social, economic and political implications of technological change, including the Internet and autonomous vehicles, with emphasis on planning strategies and urban implications. This research interest is characterized by the recent publication of the book, Global Information Society (Rowman & Littlefield 2013), with Aharon Kellerman and Kenneth E Corey; and 3) The use of social media and big data as a research tool for understanding public attitudes towards cities, events and technological change.

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