Height Management of Ornamentals

  • Success with PGRs

    Published on March 18, 2019

    Regardless of the desired outcome, successful use of a plant growth regulator (PGR) requires multiple considerations and attention to detail. This article summarizes practices to obtain the best results from your PGR applications.

  • Ethylene in floriculture

    Published on January 7, 2019

    Ethylene can be a harmful contaminant in greenhouses and during shipping, but there are also situations when ethylene can elicit desirable responses in greenhouse crop production.

  • Using a GA to increase plant height

    Published on August 8, 2018

    Regardless of the cause, the most common technique to increase plant height of containerized flowering plants is an application of gibberellic acid by someone certified as a pesticide applicator.

  • Understanding how PGRs work

    Published on May 17, 2017

    Plant growth regulators are chemical compounds that regulate various growth and developmental processes in plants, such as seed germination, rooting, branching, flowering, fruit development, dormancy and plant growth habit.

  • Fascination on poinsettia

    Published on August 8, 2016

    Did you hit your poinsettias with too much growth retardant? This Michigan State University research shows how to recover using products that contain gibberellic acid.

  • Environment and PGR interactions

    Published on December 17, 2015

    When plant growth regulators (PGRs) are applied as sprays, their efficacy can be greatly influenced by the environment. Understanding how environmental factors influence PGR spray efficacy can lead to more effective and predictable plant responses.

  • Trending: PGR sprenches

    Published on April 17, 2015

    A sprench of a plant growth regulator (PGR) is a hybrid of a spray and a drench application, and is increasingly being used in the production of greenhouse ornamentals.

  • The PGR ancymidol

    Published on February 17, 2015

    Plant growth retardants (PGRs) that contain the active ingredient ancymidol aren’t as commonly used in floriculture as most other PGRs, but there are some potential upsides that merit consideration.

  • Increasing plant height

    Published on October 17, 2014

    There are numerous ways to promote extension growth, including changes to plant culture or the growing environment, or applying a plant growth regulator that includes gibberellic acid.

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