Fruit Pest and Beneficial Listing Widget

Apples Insect


  • Alternaria blotch

    Disease

    The disease primarily affects the foliage, causing circular, necrotic lesions with a light brown interior that later become surrounded by a darker purplish halo.

  • Alternaria fruit rot

    Disease

    The disease appears as velvety dark green to black, circular, sunken lesions on mature fruit; the infected tissue is firm and brown. Disease is typically associated with over-ripe or damaged fruit, or fruit held in storage.

  • American hawthorn rust

    Disease

    Attacks only the leaves of apple and pear; affects the apple varieties McIntosh and Cortland in particular.

  • Apple anthracnose

    Disease

    Branch lesions first appear as small, circular spots that are purple or red when wet. As lesions enlarge, they become elliptical, sunken and turn orange to brown. A distinct margin develops between healthy and diseased tissue, which eventually causes the bark to crack around the infected area.

  • Apple latent viruses

    Disease

    Latent viruses are viruses that survive in their host without causing symptoms. These viruses are transmitted when a virus-infected scion is grafted onto a susceptible rootstock.

  • Apple mosaic virus

    Disease

    Young leaves develop pale to bright cream-colored spots, blotches, bandings or patterns as they expand in the spring. These turn brown and become necrotic as they age and premature defoliation may occur when infection is severe.

  • Apple scab

    Disease

    On leaves, young lesions are velvety brown to olive green with indistinct margins, and will often not be readily noticeable until after petal fall in commercial orchards.

  • Apple union necrosis and decline

    Disease

    AUND is due to an incompatibility at the graft union where a resistant scion is grafted onto a susceptible, but tolerant rootstock, most commonly MM.106.

  • Armillaria root rot

    Disease

    The bark at the crown and roots sloughs off easily, exposing the dense white growth of the fungus. The growth extends in a fan-like pattern underneath the bark. Black shoestring-like strands may be obvious on the surface of the bark.

  • Assassin bugs

    Beneficial

    The head is narrow and elongate with the portion behind the eyes neck-like. Sometimes a sculptured crest may be found on the pronotum. The front legs are specialized for hunting.

  • Bitter pit and cork spot

    Disease

    Small, green to purplish to light brown, slightly sunken lesions appear on the surface of mature fruit. Individual lesions on the fruit surface are dry and do not extend deep into the fruit; however, cutting into the fruit can reveal numerous internal lesions.

  • Bitter rot

    Disease

    Bitter rot appears on young fruit as small, circular brown lesions. Lesions expand rapidly and radially under wet and warm conditions. As they age, they turn darker brown and become sunken.

  • Black pox of apple (blister canker of pear)

    Disease

    On apple, conical, smooth, shiny black swellings are evident on current season's growth. As lesions age, they become ovoid with raised borders. On leaves, lesions begin as small, circular green spots surrounded by a red halo.

  • Black rot (Blossom end rot, Frogeye leaf spot)

    Disease

    Fruit infections that occur early in the season appear at the calyx end and typically develop into blossom end rot that may not appear until the fruit begin to mature.

  • Blister spot

    Disease

    Lesions begin as small, darkened, water-soaked areas, generally around lenticels and typically on the lower half of the apple.

  • Blue mold

    Disease

    Blue mold enters the fruit through wounds, stem-end invasion, or as a core rot. Infection is first visible as a soft and sunken, yellow to pale-brown circular lesion on the surface of the fruit.

  • Brooks fruit spot

    Disease

    Appears as irregular, slightly sunken dark green lesions on immature fruit.

  • Calyx end rot

    Disease

    Symptoms begin at the calyx end of the fruit, causing a reddish discoloration at the site of infection. The rot is at first soft, but eventually dries out, turning tan to brown with a red border.

  • Cedar apple rust

    Disease

    On leaves, the disease appears on the upper surface as small, faint, yellow spots shortly after the appearance of active cedar galls found on the alternate host for this fungus, the red cedar.

  • Crown gall

    Disease

    Infected trees are often stunted and produce small, chlorotic leaves. Spherical to elongated swellings along the roots or on the trunk just above the soil line is the primary symptom.