Food Crises and Food Markets: Implications for Emergency Response in Southern Africa

October 1, 2008 - Author: David Tschirley and T.S. Jayne

IDWP 94. David Tschirley and T.S. Jayne. 2008. Food Crises and Food Markets: Implications for Emergency Response in Southern Africa


EXECUTIVE SUMMARY:
Concern about humanitarian crises in southern Africa, especially in light of the surge in
world food prices since 2007, has been accompanied by calls for direct government action in
food markets. This paper reviews how Zambia, Malawi, and Mozambique handled private
food markets during the food crises of 2001/02, 2002/03, and 2005/06, which may provide
important lessons for the management of future crises. Lack of trust between government
and traders can lead to behavior that undermines the interests of each and harms consumers
and farmers; Malawi and Zambia have persistently fallen into this trap while Mozambique
has partially avoided it. Empirical policy analysis can make an important contribution to
resolution only within a consultative process involving a broad range of (often fractious)
stakeholders.

Key words: Southern Africa, Malawi, Mozambique, Zambia, markets, emergency response,
trust

Tags: agrifood system transformation, emergency response, idwp, markets, southern africa, trust


Authors

David L. Tschirley

David L. Tschirley
517-355-0134
tschirle@msu.edu


For more information visit:

Food Security Group

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