Bone broths are brimming with nutrients

Bone broth can be used to prepare a great wintertime meal that is perfect in case you catch the cold or flu.

November 29, 2018 - Author: Leatta Byrd,

Brown soup in white bowl with vegetables.

Bone broth is a stock that can be made from beef, ham, turkey, chicken or fish bones that are boiled to become a broth. The broth may still have some meat attached and can be cooked 24 hours or more. The goal is not only to extract the gelatin from the bones, but also to release the nutritious minerals. Medical experts say that bone broth is promoted as having a unique combination of amino acids, minerals, collagen and cartilage compounds, which helps to fight off colds and maintain healthy bones and skin. Michigan State University Extension recommends eating broth and soups, especially during the wintertime.

Bone broths can be enriched or enhanced by adding fresh vegetables to increase their nutrient content. Current dietary guidelines recommends that people eat vegetables at each meal daily. Nutrition experts recommend that when purchasing or preparing bone broths you should:

  • Watch the sodium content. Avoid adding additional table salt because it will increase the sodium content already in the broth.
  • Beware of hidden ingredients by checking your ingredient labels for unexpected calories from cream, butter and Limit the hidden ingredients to avoid adding extra calories.
  • Add vegetables or whole grains to bone broth to increase its nutritional value.

Currently, there is not much research to support or refute specific health claims about bone broth, according to Jennifer Nelson RD, LD. For now, she recommends to get your flu shot and wash your hands often, actions that are known to have positive health effects. Regardless, stocking up on broths in case you catch a cold or the flu will make the healing process tasty as you enjoy having some homemade soup or broth.

Just like the inspirational expression “chicken noodle soup is good for the soul” bone broth is as good as anything on a cold winter day.

Tags: food & health, msu extension, nutrition


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