Introducing Food Safety Labels in Complex Food Supply Chains: Evidence from a Choice Experiment in Nigeria

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May 8, 2019 - Author: , Lenis Saweda O. Liverpool-Tasie, Caputo Vincenzina, John Kerr

Awa Sanou, Lenis Saweda O. Liverpool-Tasie, Caputo Vincenzina, John Kerr 2019. Introducing Food Safety Labels in Complex Food Supply Chains: Evidence from a Choice Experiment in Nigeria, Food Security Policy Research Brief 93, East Lansing: Michigan State University.

Key Findings

  • Maize traders respond to attributes their buyers care about and will pay a price premium for.
  • Wholesalers who sell to buyers (other large traders, large feed mills, food companies) who know or care about aflatoxin exhibit the highest mean WTP for aflatoxin safe certification.
  • Traders who sell to consumers consistently have a low WTP for aflatoxin certification; consistent with the fact that they don’t know about aflatoxins.
  • Traders selling to consumers exhibit the highest WTP for low moisture content, an attribute they are familiar with, but it is an incomplete measure of aflatoxin contamination.
  • Nigerian traders trust reputable domestic organizations over foreign ones for aflatoxin certification.

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Tags: agrifood system transformation, c1-c2, cross-cutting-nutrition, fsg policy brief, fsp policy brief, household income and livelihoods, nigeria, nutrition, sustainable agricultural intensification, value chain analysis


Related Topic Areas

Nigeria, C1-C2


Authors

Awa Sanou

Awa Sanou
sanouawa@msu.edu

Saweda Liverpool-Tasie

Saweda Liverpool-Tasie
517-432-5418
lliverp@msu.edu

Vincenzina Caputo

Vincenzina Caputo
517-884-8656
vcaputo@msu.edu


For more information visit:

Food Security Group
Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Food Security Policy

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