Introducing Food Safety Labels in Complex Food Supply Chains: Evidence from a Choice Experiment in Nigeria

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May 8, 2019 - Author: , Lenis Saweda O. Liverpool-Tasie, Caputo Vincenzina, John Kerr

Awa Sanou, Lenis Saweda O. Liverpool-Tasie, Caputo Vincenzina, John Kerr 2019. Introducing Food Safety Labels in Complex Food Supply Chains: Evidence from a Choice Experiment in Nigeria, Food Security Policy Research Brief 93, East Lansing: Michigan State University.

Key Findings

  • Maize traders respond to attributes their buyers care about and will pay a price premium for.
  • Wholesalers who sell to buyers (other large traders, large feed mills, food companies) who know or care about aflatoxin exhibit the highest mean WTP for aflatoxin safe certification.
  • Traders who sell to consumers consistently have a low WTP for aflatoxin certification; consistent with the fact that they don’t know about aflatoxins.
  • Traders selling to consumers exhibit the highest WTP for low moisture content, an attribute they are familiar with, but it is an incomplete measure of aflatoxin contamination.
  • Nigerian traders trust reputable domestic organizations over foreign ones for aflatoxin certification.

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Tags: agrifood system transformation, c1-c2, cross-cutting-nutrition, food security group, fsg policy brief, fsp policy brief, household income and livelihoods, innovation lab for food security policy, nigeria, nutrition, sustainable agricultural intensification, value chain analysis


Authors

Awa Sanou

Awa Sanou
sanouawa@msu.edu

Saweda Liverpool-Tasie

Saweda Liverpool-Tasie
lliverp@msu.edu

Vincenzina Caputo

Vincenzina Caputo
vcaputo@msu.edu

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