Doug Landis named Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

Landis was nominated for distinguished contributions to the field of ecology, particularly for uncovering the role of landscape structure in regulating insect biodiversity and ecosystem services.

DAL headshot 2016EAST LANSING, Mich.Doug Landis, a University Distinguished Professor in the Michigan State University Department of Entomology and Ecology, Evolution and Behavior Program, has been named a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). Election as a AAAS Fellow is an honor bestowed upon AAAS members by their peers.

Landis was nominated for distinguished contributions to the field of ecology, particularly for uncovering the role of landscape structure in regulating insect biodiversity and ecosystem services. His research focuses on the ecology, conservation and management of insects in landscapes containing both natural and managed ecosystems.

The Landis lab’s research themes include understanding the influence of landscape structure on insect ecology, design of sustainable landscapes to promote ecosystem services, invasive species ecology and management, and conservation/restoration of rare species and communities.

“I am very honored to be recognized by AAAS,” Landis said. “I want to thank my many students, postdoctoral research associates, technicians and colleagues who have contributed to the lab’s success over the years.”

Landis earned a bachelor’s degree in biology from Goshen College, as well as a master’s and doctorate in entomology from North Carolina State University. He joined the faculty in the MSU Department of Entomology in 1988.

He is the author of more than 170 peer-reviewed journal articles, 25 book chapters and 58 MSU Extension bulletins. He has previously received the Recognition Award in Entomology from the Entomological Society of America for outstanding contributions to agriculture, an MSU Distinguished Faculty Award, and was named a Fellow of the Entomological Society of America.

Landis also serves on the leadership teams of the Kellogg Biological Station Long-Term Ecological Research Program and the Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center.

The tradition of AAAS Fellows began in 1874. Currently, members can be considered for the rank of Fellow if nominated by the steering groups of the association’s 24 sections, or by any three Fellows who are current AAAS members (so long as two of the three sponsors are not affiliated with the nominee’s institution), or by the AAAS chief executive officer. Fellows must have been continuous members of AAAS for four years by the end of the calendar year in which they are elected. The AAAS Fellow honor comes with an expectation that recipients maintain the highest standards of professional ethics and scientific integrity.

This year 489 members have been awarded the honor by AAAS because of their scientifically or socially distinguished efforts to advance science or its applications.

This year’s AAAS Fellows will be formally announced in the AAAS News & Notes section of the journal Science Nov. 27. A virtual Fellows Forum — an induction ceremony for the new Fellows — will be held Feb. 13, 2021.

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