Nutrition & Lead

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December 7, 2016 - Author:

Nutrition can play an important role in helping to limit the absorption of lead in the body. Eating nutrient-dense foods from a range of food groups provides your body with a variety of vitamins and minerals.

This practice promotes overall health and can help you reach the recommended amounts of the key nutrients that can limit lead absorption: iron, calcium and vitamin C.

Following the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans and using MyPlate is a great way to do this. The guidelines include:

  • Follow a healthy eating pattern across the lifespan.
  • Focus on variety, nutrient density and amount.
  • Limit calories from added sugars and saturated fats and reduce sodium intake.
  • Shift to healthier food and beverage choices.
  • Support healthy eating patterns for all.

For more information and practical tips visit choosemyplate.org.

Michigan State University Extension offers free nutrition and physical activity class series and one-time presentations for Michigan residents of all ages. For more information or to sign up for a class, contact your local MSU Extension office at msue.msu.edu/county.

Each recipe in this booklet uses low-cost ingredients to help you prepare tasty, nutritious meals. These recipes are a source of iron, calcium, vitamin C and a range of other nutrients.

 For an accessible version of this recipe booklet please contact MSU Extension educator Erin Powell powelle9@msu.edu

Key Terms (as related to nutrition): 

  • Absorption: The process that moves molecules, including vitamins and minerals, from the stomach into the body. 
  • Daily Value: A measure of each nutrient on the food label. The Daily Value is often close to the Recommended Dietary Allowance. It helps users see how much of a certain nutrient is in a serving-size portion of food compared with how much is recommended.
  • Deficiency: Not having enough of a nutrient that your body needs.
  • Fortification: The process of adding a nutrient (vitamin or mineral) to a food to improve its nutritional quality.
  • Nutrient-dense: Foods that contain a lot of nutrients and relatively few calories.
  • Recommended Dietary Allowance: The average daily intake of a nutrient needed to meet the nutrient needs of the body for most healthy people.

Reading Food Labels

Knowing how to read food labels can help you make healthy choices. You can find out what percentage of a nutrient’s daily value (%DV) is in the product. For a food to be considered a good source of any nutrient, it must contain 10% to 19% of the daily value (%DV) per serving. For a food to be considered high, rich or an excellent source of any nutrient, it must contain 20% or more of the daily value (%DV) per serving. For items that are missing a food label, such as fresh foods, visit www.supertracker.usda.gov to find the nutrition facts.

Recipes

Veggie Loaded Burgers

Makes 8 servings

Ingredients:

  • 1 15-ounce can (low-sodium or salt-free) beans, black, pinto or whatever beans you have on hand
  • 1 cup green bell pepper, rinsed and finely chopped
  • 1 pound ground beef
  • 1 egg
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • black pepper to taste
  • 8 whole-wheat buns

Directions:

  1. Wash hands and all food preparation surfaces.
  2. Mix beans and peppers in a medium bowl and mash with your fingers.
  3. Add ground beef, egg, salt and pepper.
  4. With your hands, mix until well combined.
  5. For sliders, make 16 patties and for burgers, make 8 patties.
  6. Panfry, broil or grill on the BBQ.
  7. Serve on whole grain buns. For sliders, cut whole grain hot dog buns into three parts.
  8. Garnish with fresh spinach, sliced roma tomato and sweet onion (optional).

Tip: Add more veggies like broccoli, carrots, Brussels sprouts, beets, to make the burgers even more nutritious.

Nutrition facts per serving: 302 calories, 8g fat, 3g saturated fat, 228mg sodium, 33g carbohydrate, 7g fiber, 16g protein, 124 mg calcium, 3.7 mg iron, 13 mg vitamin C

Adapted from: Brown, Leanne. 2014. Good and Cheap: Eat Well on $4/Day. www.leannebrown.com

Quick Skillet Lasagna

Makes 8 servings

Ingredients:

  • 1 pound lean ground meat; beef, turkey or game
  • 1 cup onion, rinsed and chopped
  • 3 cloves garlic, peeled and minced
  • 1 cup green bell pepper, rinsed and chopped
  • 1 28-ounce can tomato sauce with Italian seasoning
  • 1 10-ounce package spinach, rinsed and chopped
  • 6 cups cooked whole wheat pasta
  • 1 cup low-fat cottage cheese 1 cup shredded mozzarella cheese

Directions:

  1. Wash hands and all food preparation surfaces.
  2. In a 10-inch skillet, preferably cast iron, cook the meat over medium-high for 5 minutes stirring to break up.
  3. Add onions, garlic and green pepper. Cook until meat is browned and cooked through (about 10 minutes).
  4. Drain off fat.
  5. Add tomato sauce and spinach. Bring to a boil and simmer 10 minutes.
  6. Taste and season with salt, pepper and Italian seasoning.
  7. Turn heat to low and stir cooked pasta into the sauce.
  8. Mix cottage cheese and mozzarella cheese together.
  9. Drop cheese mixture, by spoonfuls, into sauce.
  10. Cover and heat over low heat until cheese melts, or place under broiler to melt cheese.

Nutrition facts per serving: 320 calories, 8.5g fat, 2.8g saturated fat, 40mg cholesterol, 770mg sodium, 38g carbohydrate, 6.6g fiber, 27g protein, 242 mg calcium, 4.9 mg iron, 31.5 mg vitamin C

Adapted from: Michigan State University Extension, 2015. Eating Right is Simple Recipe Set

Michigan Bean Salad

Makes 8 servings

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup green bell pepper, rinsed and chopped
  • 1 cup red bell pepper, rinsed and chopped
  • 1 cup onion, rinsed and chopped 1 cup celery, rinsed and chopped
  • 1 15-ounce can white corn (reduced sodium or no salt added), drained
  • 1 15-ounce can pinto beans (reduced sodium or no salt added), drained
  • 1 15-ounce can black eyed peas (reduced sodium or no salt added), drained
  • ½ cup canola oil 1 cup sugar ¾ cup vinegar; white, red or cider
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 Tablespoon water

Directions:

  1. Wash hands and all food preparation surfaces.
  2. Mix peppers, onions, celery, corn, beans and peas in a medium bowl.
  3. In a small saucepan, mix oil, sugar, vinegar, salt and water then boil for 2 minutes.
  4. Pour dressing over salad and chill in the refrigerator.

Nutrition facts per serving: 367 calories, 15 g fat, .23 g saturated fat, 545 mg sodium, 53 g carbohydrate, 6 g fiber, 7 g protein, 56 mg calcium, 1.9 mg iron, 30 mg vitamin C

Adapted from: Michigan State University Extension. 2015. Eating Right is Simple Recipe Set.

Apple, Carrot and Raisin Salad

Makes 4 servings

Ingredients:

  • 1 ½ cups carrots, rinsed and shredded
  • 1 apple, rinsed and diced
  • ½ cup raisins
  • 3 Tablespoons calcium-fortified orange juice
  • 3 teaspoons apple cider vinegar ½ Tablespoon brown sugar
  • 2 Tablespoons non-fat plain or Greek yogurt
  • 2 cups fresh baby spinach, rinsed

Directions:

  1. Wash hands and all food preparation surfaces.
  2. Stir carrot, apples and raisins together in a mixing bowl.
  3. In a separate bowl, mix orange juice, vinegar, sugar and yogurt.
  4. Pour dressing over salad and chill in the refrigerator.
  5. Serve salad over fresh spinach.

Nutrition facts per serving: 115 calories, 2g fat, 0g saturated fat, 0g cholesterol, 50mg sodium, 27g carbohydrate, 3g fiber, 2g protein, 71 mg calcium, 1.2 mg iron, 13 mg vitamin C

Adapted from: Michigan State University Extension. 2015. Eating Right is Simple Recipe Set

Oven Fries

Ingredients:

  • 4 medium russet or sweet potatoes
  • 1 Tablespoon canola oil vegetable oil spray
  • ½ teaspoon salt or seasoning of your choice

Directions:

  1. Wash hands and all food preparation surfaces.
  2. Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.
  3. Scrub and cut potatoes into ½-inch-thick strips.
  4. Rinse in cold water several times until water is no longer cloudy.
  5. Dry potato strips on paper towel or clean kitchen towel.
  6. In large bowl, toss potatoes with canola oil.
  7. Spray cookie sheet with vegetable oil.
  8. Season potatoes with:--salt --for chicken fries, use the season packet from chicken ramen noodles --for cheese fries, season with ¼ cheese packet from mac and cheese box --for spicy fries, use chili powder or Cajun seasoning. Note: the nutrition facts below are based on russet potatoes with ½ tsp salt. If you change the seasoning, it could increase or decrease the sodium levels.
  9. Lay potato strips in single layer and bake for 40-55 minutes, turning over after 20 minutes to crisp on all sides.

Nutrition facts per serving: 132 calories, 2.5 g fat, .2 g saturated fat, 209 mg sodium, 24 g carbohydrate, 2.7 g fiber, 3 g protein, 21 mg calcium, 1.2 mg iron, 9.5 mg vitamin C

Adapted from: Michigan State University Extension. 2015. Eating Right is Simple Recipe Set.

Chic Penne

Makes 6 servings

Ingredients:

  • 3 cups uncooked whole-wheat penne pasta
  • 1 teaspoon granulated garlic
  • 2 cups fresh broccoli florets, rinsed
  • 1 cup cooked chicken, diced 1 ½ cups fat-free half and half
  • 1 Tablespoon all-purpose flour
  • 1/8 cup low-sodium chicken broth
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • ½ teaspoon ground black pepper
  • ½ cup reduced-fat cheddar cheese, shredded
  • ½ cup low-fat mozzarella cheese, low-moisture, part-skim, shredded Nonstick cooking spray

Directions:

  1. Wash hands and all food preparation surfaces.
  2. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.
  3. In a large pot, bring 2 quarts water to a boil. Gradually stir in pasta and return to a boil. Cook uncovered for 8-10 minutes or until tender. Do not overcook. Drain well. Toss pasta with ½ teaspoon garlic.
  4. Fill a medium pot with water and bring to a boil. Add broccoli florets and cook for 5 minutes. Drain well. Sprinkle with remaining garlic.
  5. Transfer pasta and broccoli to a medium casserole dish (about 8 inches by 11 inches) coated with nonstick cooking spray. Add chicken. Mix well.
  6. In a small mixing bowl, mix ½ cup half and half with flour. Whisk to remove lumps.
  7. In a medium skillet, heat chicken broth, salt, pepper and remaining half and half. Stir constantly. Stir in half and half/flour mixture. Stir constantly and bring to a boil.
  8. Reduce heat to low. Stir frequently for 5 minutes. Sauce will thicken. Add cheese and stir until cheese melts. Remove from heat. Pour sauce over broccoli/pasta mixture.
  9. Cover casserole dish with lid or with foil. Bake at 350 degrees F for 8 minutes. Heat to an internal temperature of 165 degrees F or higher for at least 15 seconds (use a food thermometer to check the internal temperature). Remove from oven. Serve hot.

Nutrition facts per serving: 300 calories, 6 g fat, 2 g saturated fat, 418 mg sodium, 44 g carbohydrate, 6 g fiber, 19 g protein, 231 mg calcium, 2 mg iron, 17 mg vitamin C

Source: United States Department of Agriculture Food and Nutrition Service. Recipes for Health Kids: Cookbook for Homes. Retrieved on Feb. 23, 2016, from http://www.fns.usda.gov/tn/recipes-healthy-kidscookbook-homes

Fish Sliders

Makes 4 servings

Ingredients:

  • 13 ounces canned salmon, mackerel or other canned fish (with bones)
  • 2 slices of bread, 100% whole wheat, torn into tiny pieces and crumbs
  • ½ of one green pepper, rinsed and chopped
  • 1 stalk celery, rinsed and chopped
  • ¼ onion, rinsed and chopped
  • 1/8 teaspoon pepper
  • 2 Tablespoons lemon juice
  • 2 eggs, well beaten
  • Vegetable oil or spray
  • 1 package whole-grain hot dog buns
  • Sliced Roma tomatoes and fresh spinach

Directions:

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F

  1. Thoroughly wash hands and all food preparation surfaces.
  2. Drain fish.
  3. Sauté pepper, celery and onion in oil until tender.
  4. Combine fish, bread crumbs, green pepper, celery, pepper and lemon juice in a mixing bowl.
  5. Beat eggs with fork in small bowl. Add eggs to fish mixture.
  6. Form mixture into 16 small patties. Place on a cookie sheet.
  7. Bake at 350 degrees F for 20 minutes, or until internal temperature of 145 degrees F is reached. OR pan fry until golden, about 3 minutes on each side.
  8. Cut hot dog buns into thirds. Serve Fish Sliders with greens, tomatoes, onion, and other fresh vegetables!

Nutrition facts per serving (baked): 384 calories, 11 g fat, 2 g saturated fat, 150 mg cholesterol, 807 mg sodium, 37 g carbohydrate, 6 g fiber, 34 g protein, 425 mg calcium, 4 mg iron, 34 mg vitamin C

Adapted from: Michigan State University Extension. 2015. Eating Right is Simple Recipe Set.

Best Tomato Sauce

Makes 4 servings

Ingredients:

  • 1 Tablespoon canola oil
  • 3 cloves garlic, finely chopped
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ¼ cup onion, rinsed and finely chopped
  • Pinch crushed red chili flakes
  • 28-ounce can tomatoes, crushed or diced
  • 6-ounce can tomato paste
  • ½ teaspoon sugar

Directions:

  1. Wash hands and all food preparation surfaces.
  2. Add oil to saucepan on medium high heat.
  3. Add garlic, onion and salt, and sauté until translucent, about 1 minute.
  4. Add chili flakes and stir for 10 seconds.
  5. Add tomatoes, paste and sugar. Stir and bring to a boil. 6
  6. Simmer gently for 15 minutes. You can now use this for tomato sauce in another recipe. For a thicker sauce, to serve over pasta, simmer longer and season with ½ tsp. Italian seasoning.

Nutrition facts per serving: 107 calories, 4 g fat, .5 g saturated fat, 0 g cholesterol, 610 mg sodium, 18 g carbohydrate, 6 g fiber, 3.7 g protein, 87 mg calcium, 2.4 mg iron, 54 mg vitamin C

Adapted from: Brown, Leanne. 2014. Good and Cheap: Eat Well on $4/Day. www.leannebrown.com 

Lentil Spaghetti

Makes 8 servings

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups water
  • ½ cup dried lentils
  • 1 Tablespoon canola oil
  • ½ cup carrot, rinsed and chopped
  • ½ cup onion, rinsed and chopped
  • 2 pinches salt
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • ½ green pepper, rinsed and chopped
  • 1 batch “Best Tomato Sauce” (see pg 13) or 3 cups canned tomato sauce
  • ¼ teaspoon Italian seasoning pepper to taste
  • 8 ounces whole-wheat spaghetti pasta

Directions:

  1. Wash hands and all food preparation surfaces.
  2. Rinse lentils and drain.
  3. Bring water and lentils to a boil in a medium saucepan.
  4. Simmer 20 minutes.
  5. Heat a saucepan on medium high.
  6. Add canola oil and carrots and sauté for 2 minutes.
  7. Add onion, salt, garlic and green pepper. Sauté for 2 minutes.
  8. Add tomato sauce and Italian seasoning.
  9. Bring to a boil. Turn down heat and simmer.
  10. When lentils are done they will be tender to the bite. At this point drain and add to tomato sauce.
  11. While sauce simmers, cook spaghetti according to package directions.
  12. Serve sauce over pasta.

Nutrition facts per serving: 253 calories, 5 g fat, .4 g saturated fat, 0 g cholesterol, 91 mg sodium, 44 g carbohydrate, 6.7 g fiber, 11 g protein, 30 mg calcium, 2.96 mg iron, 19.88 mg vitamin C

Adapted from: Michigan State University Extension. 2015. Eating Right is Simple Recipe Set. 

Brussels Sprouts Hash and Eggs

Makes 2 servings

Ingredients:

  • 4 cups Brussels sprouts, rinsed and finely chopped
  • ½ teaspoon salt pepper to taste
  • 1 Tablespoon butter
  • 3 cloves garlic, finely chopped
  • 6 olives, finely chopped
  • lemon juice
  • 2 eggs

Directions:

  1. Wash hands and all food preparation surfaces.
  2. Chop off the ends of the sprouts. Slice them in half, then finely shred each half. Place the shreds in a bowl and sprinkle with salt and pepper.
  3. Melt the butter in a non-stick pan on medium high heat. Swirl it around to coat the pan. Add the Brussels sprout shreds and garlic, then leave it to cook for about 1 minute.
  4. Mix it up and toss it around. Add the olives and mix again.
  5. Crack the eggs into separate areas of the pan. Sprinkle them with salt and pepper.
  6. Pour in 2 tablespoons of water and cover with a lid. Let the eggs steam, undisturbed, for 2 minutes.
  7. Once the whites of the eggs are cooked through, turn off the heat and sprinkle everything with lemon juice.

Nutrition facts per serving: 255 calories, 14.5 g fat, 5.6 g saturated fat, 861 mg sodium, 25 g carbohydrate, 14 g fiber, 14 g protein, 158 mg calcium, 5 mg iron, 199 mg vitamin C

Adapted from: Brown, Leanne. 2015. Good and Cheap: Eat Well on $4/Day. www.leannebrown.com

Tomato Scrambled Eggs

Makes 2 servings

Ingredients:

  • ½ Tablespoon butter
  • 4 cups fresh tomatoes or 2 cups canned tomatoes, chopped
  • 4 eggs
  • ¼ teaspoon salt pepper to taste
  • Optional additions: fresh basil or other herbs, chopped

Directions:

  1. Wash hands and all food preparation surfaces.
  2. Put a small pan on medium heat and melt the butter, then swirl it around to coat the pan. Add the tomatoes. Cook until the tomatoes release their juice and most of the juice evaporates, about 5 to 7 minutes.
  3. Meanwhile, crack the eggs into a bowl and add a sprinkle of salt and pepper. Beat the eggs lightly with a fork.
  4. Once most of the juice has cooked out of the tomatoes, turn the heat down to low and add the eggs to the pan. Using a spatula, gently mix the eggs and tomatoes. Carefully stir the eggs to keep them from forming chunks. Turn down the heat as low as possible; the slower your eggs cook, the creamier they’ll be.
  5. Once the eggs are done, turn off the heat and add any chopped herbs you have around. Basil is the best with tomatoes.
  6. If you have some around, serve over toast or a tortilla.

Nutrition facts per serving (without tortilla): 246 calories, 8 g fat, 3 g saturated fat, 834 mg sodium, 18 g carbohydrate, 4 g fiber, 10 g protein, 111 mg calcium, 4 mg iron, 22 mg vitamin C

Adapted from: Brown, Leanne. 2014. Good and Cheap: Eat Well on $4/Day. www.leannebrown.com 

LEAD FACTS & RESOURCES

Lead isn’t good for anyone’s health, and it’s especially bad for small children and pregnant women. Keep your family lead-safe by avoiding contact with it. You and your children could be exposed to lead from a variety of sources including: old paint, dust, dirt, pottery, make-up, toys and some home remedies. If you are concerned about contaminated water, check with local authorities for safe water recommendations. Use of a NSF-certified filter or bottled water for drinking, cooking and mixing baby formula may be required. If using a filter, make sure to change the filter cartridge by the date printed on the package. If you have any concerns about lead or your child’s diet, talk to your doctor.

Lead Resources: 

  • Michigan Department of Environmental Quality (MDEQ): www.mi.gov/FlintWater.
  • Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (MDHHS) Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program: www.michigan.gov/lead; phone: 888-322-4453.
  • U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC): www.cdc.gov/nceh/lead.
  • U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): www.epa.gov/lead.

Additional Genesee County Resources:

211

Service connects Genesee County residents to community resources, including food, transportation, education, health care, water filters and replacement cartridges. Locally funded by United Way Genesee County. Contact them by phone at 211 or online at www.211.org.

Flint Water Department

Offers free water testing. Pick up test kits at 1101 S. Saginaw Street, Flint; phone 810-787-6537.

Genesee County Community Action Resource Department (GCCARD)

Offers free water filters; phone 810-789-3746 or 810-232-2185.

Michigan State University Extension

Offers free nutrition education classes and soil testing for lead. Phone 810-244-8500.

 

These materials were partially funded by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Education (SNAP-Ed) by way of the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services through Michigan State University Extension, and also partially by Hurley Children’s Hospital.

This institution is prohibited from discriminating on the basis of race, color, national origin, disability, age, sex and in some cases religion or political beliefs.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture also prohibits discrimination based on race, color, national origin, sex, religious creed, disability, age, political beliefs, or reprisal or retaliation for prior civil rights activity in any program or activity conducted or funded by USDA.

Persons with disabilities who require alternative means of communication for program information (e.g. Braille, large print, audiotape, American Sign Language, etc.), should contact the agency (state or local) where they applied for benefits. Individuals who are deaf, hard of hearing or have speech disabilities may contact USDA through the Federal Relay Service at (800) 877-8339. Additionally, program information may be made available in languages other than English.

To file a program complaint of discrimination, complete the USDA Program Discrimination Complaint Form (AD-3027), found online at: http://www.ascr.usda.gov/complaint_filing_cust.html, and at any USDA office, or write a letter addressed to USDA and provide in the letter all of the information requested in the form. To request a copy of the complaint form, call (866) 632-9992. Submit your completed form or letter to USDA by:

(1) mail: U.S. Department of Agriculture Office of the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights 1400 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, D.C. 20250-9410

(2) fax: (202) 690-7442; or

(3) email: program.intake@usda.gov.

For any other information dealing with Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) issues, persons should either contact the USDA SNAP Hotline Number at (800) 221-5689, which is also in Spanish or call the State Information/Hotline Numbers (click the link for a listing of hotline numbers by State); found online at: http://www.fns.usda.gov/snap/contact_info/hotlines.htm.

To file a complaint of discrimination regarding a program receiving Federal financial assistance through the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), write: HHS Director, Office for Civil Rights, Room 515-F, 200 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, D.C. 20201 or call (202) 619-0403 (voice) or (800) 537-7697 (TTY).

This institution is an equal opportunity provider.

 

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