• CANR Dean’s Choice Awards fuel study abroad, undergrad research

    The Michigan State University College of Agriculture and Natural Resources (CANR) has supported two exciting programs that college officials say are critical to the undergraduate experience. With funding from the MSU Federal Credit Union (MSUFCU), the 2013-14 Dean’s Choice Award recognized a student-created study abroad trip to Fiji, and the 2014-15 award led to a new undergraduate research forum to prepare students for larger competitions.

     

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  • Study abroad to Vietnam links global food center and agriculture students

    Michigan State University animal science senior Rachel Baumgardner will get a new perspective on the world when she travels from her rural Michigan hometown of fewer than 1,000 people to Hanoi, Vietnam, in March.

    Thanks to a partnership between the Global Center for Food Systems Innovation (GCFSI) and the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources (CANR) at MSU, Baumgardner and seven other students will get the opportunity to study international agriculture during the weeklong trip.

     

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  • Rich Merritt receives Life Time Achievement Award from American Academy of Forensic Sciences

    Rich Merritt receives Life Time Achievement Award from American Academy of Forensic Sciences

    Former entomology chairperson Rich Merritt received the Life Time Achievement Award in Forensic Science from the Pathology/Biology Section of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences (AAFS) at their meeting in February 2015 in Orlando, Florida.

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  • Worldwide, the nitrogen cycle is off

    Worldwide, the nitrogen cycle is off

    When exposed to nitrogen fertilizer over a period of years, nitrogen-fixing bacteria called rhizobia evolve to become less beneficial to legumes – the plants they normally serve.

    These findings, reported in the journal Evolution, may be of little interest to farmers, who generally grow only one type of plant and can always add more fertilizer to boost plant growth. But in natural areas adjacent to farmland, where fertilizer runoff occurs, or in areas where nitrogen oxides from the burning of fossil fuels settle, a change in the quality of soil rhizobia could have far-reaching ecological and environmental consequences.

     

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