Agriculture, food and natural resource students can earn MSU credits via high school program

An agreement between Michigan State University (MSU) and the Michigan Department of Education Office of Career and Technical Education will allow high school students to earn college credits while they're still in high school.

An agreement between Michigan State University (MSU) and the Michigan Department of Education Office of Career and Technical Education will allow high school students to earn college credits while they’re still in high school.

Students who complete a state-approved agriculture, food and natural resources education program and receive the State FFA Degree can receive six credits toward a bachelor’s degree or undergraduate certificate program at MSU.

“This is an exciting time in agriculture and natural resources. Graduates in these programs are getting hired into meaningful careers,” said Kelly Millenbah, associate dean and director in the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources. “Students with experience in agriculture and natural resources – such as FFA degree programs – are in high demand.”

The credits will apply to the total number required for graduation and may be used to meet the requirements of the student’s program at MSU, pending approval of the major department. The credits cannot be used to fulfill general education requirements such as math and English.

“MSU is the first land-grant university in the country to make such a bold step,” said Randy Showerman, director of the MSU Institute of Agricultural Technology. 

Students who want to apply these credits to their MSU degrees need to work with their departmental advisers to ascertain exactly how the credits will count, Showerman said.

Showerman noted that there are 7,234 FFA members in Michigan, including 387 who received their State FFA Degree March 12 during the FFA State Convention, held during ANR Week at MSU. If admitted to MSU, every one would be eligible to receive the six credits.

“Students are in state-approved agriculture, food and natural resources programs in 110 communities around the state,” Showerman said. “In these programs, students learn about the science of agriculture, as well as the hows and whys. These programs focus on the three R’s: rigor, relevance and relationships.” 

Millenbah agreed and said that students who complete these programs and earn the State FFA Degree have a strong foundation for a successful career in their chosen fields of study.

“We think this opportunity will go a long way toward encouraging the best and brightest students, who have a good understanding of agriculture and natural resources, to study at MSU and in the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources,” Millenbah said.

For more information about the State FFA Degree program and credits available to incoming high school students, contact the local agriculture, food and natural resources teacher or high school counselor.


Michigan State University Michigan State University Close Menu button Menu and Search button Open Close